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You will read chapter 2 and create Cornell notes. You will write main points and summary of that chapter.

You will read chapter 2 and create Cornell notes. You will write main points and summary of that chapter. I will upload the Cornell Notes template that shows what is the format of the assignment. I will put an educational video link that talks about the format of the paper. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErSjc1PEGKE

2 Pesticides Name Institution Affiliation Course Tutor Date Pesticides Most of our

2

Pesticides

Name

Institution Affiliation

Course

Tutor

Date

Pesticides

Most of our food comes from industrial agriculture, which employs pesticides to keep pests under control. As a result of these positive effects, however, there are also possible negative consequences of their use that could impact human health and ecosystems.

Question 1 (herbicides)

The target of my herbicide is broadleaf weeds. The herbicide works by causing the weed to grow rapidly, exhausting its food reserves and killing it (Radcliffe et al., 2009). The herbicide is a broad spectrum, meaning it will kill any plant it comes in contact with.

Question 2

Herbicide first or the second generation refers to how the herbicide is applied to the target. If the herbicide is applied to the target before the weed seed germinates, it is considered the first generation. It is second-generation if the herbicide is applied to the target after the weed seed germinates.

Question 3

The herbicide is an effective way of controlling weeds and unwanted vegetation. It can be used on both crops and non-crop areas. Herbicides can kill or injure plants and can also be used to prevent weed seed germination or growth (Radcliffe et al., 2009). Herbicide can be applied before or after planting and can control weeds in fields and non-field settings. There are some potential drawbacks to using herbicides. Herbicides can be harmful to humans and animals if ingested and contaminate water supplies. Herbicides can also kill beneficial plants and insects and can reduce soil fertility.

Question 4

There are many potential controls for the “pest” alternative to herbicide application. Some reasonable rules include physical removal of the pest, traps or barriers, and the introduction of natural predators or parasites (Radcliffe et al., 2009). Each control method has its benefits and drawbacks, so the most effective control method will vary depending on the specific situation.

Reference

Radcliffe, E. B., Hutchison, W. D., & Cancelado, R. E. (Eds.). (2009). Integrated pest management: concepts, tactics, strategies and case studies. Cambridge University Press.

2 My professional philosophy on electronic health records Student Course Instructor Institution

You will read chapter 2 and create Cornell notes. You will write main points and summary of that chapter. Sociology Assignment Help 2

My professional philosophy on electronic health records

Student

Course

Instructor

Institution

Date

The philosophy behind creating and maintaining electronic health records is both ethical and practical. It is a philosophy that has reduced the number of paper medical records and has improved the efficiency of medical care. The medical record system that is in place has also become a platform for evaluating the health of the population as a whole, and the motivation to provide care to each individual patient. The need to create a single central repository for the electronic health record represents a big step forward for healthcare management (Shahnaz et al 2019).

It is my belief that medical records can be a platform for empowering people to manage their own health, and if you have had a personal experience with this, you will understand that the data is far more than just numbers. The data is the very building blocks of the health care system. I believe that access to this data is a tool for citizens to provide care to themselves. I believe that electronic health records represent a huge step forward in the management of healthcare. However, it is important to remember that the process of creating the records is still in its infancy. I believe that these records will be a stepping stone to a much greater system of health and healthcare management.

I believe that electronic health records are very important in the medical field, and they are a way to allow the patient to feel like and be part of the healthcare system (Elharish et al 2021). I think it is important to have a one-stop source for the patient to have all the information that they need to be taken care of. I also believe that it is important to have the physician to have the patient’s information in order to make the best treatment decisions. I believe in the goals of a single electronic health record. I also believe that it is important to share the results of treatment to the patient.

References

F. Elharish, S., Denna, I., M. Maatuk, A., & K. Elberkawi, E. (2021, April). Application of Electronic Health Records in Polyclinics: Barriers & Benefits. In International Conference on Data Science, E-learning and Information Systems 2021 (pp. 40-46).

Shahnaz, A., Qamar, U., & Khalid, A. (2019). Using blockchain for electronic health records. IEEE Access, 7, 147782-147795.

Surname2 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Date When we hear the term

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Professor’s Name

Course

Date

When we hear the term “Pit Bull,” our culture quickly conjures up thoughts of vicious, mean, aggressive, and fighting canines, which is not correct. Pit bulls have a poor reputation in our society, and many people believe that they are the worst breed of dog to possess due to their ferocious behavior. Few folks understand that, like any other breed, they are entirely dependent on their owners and their method of raising them. Pit Bulls are primarily considered to be dangerous animals that should be banned. As a result, several municipalities and governments have enacted legislation prohibiting the ownership of pit bulls and other dangerous breeds(Alonso-Recarte, 870). Untrained Pit Bulls can be as lovable as any dog with the correct training, an attentive owner, and a healthy, active lifestyle. Before we begin, allow us to define the term “Pit Bull,” as this breed does not exist. Contrary to popular misconception, pit bulls are not an aggressive dog breed. All dogs, like all humans, can be courteous or nasty, react positively or adversely to their environment, and engage with others in socially acceptable or unsuitable ways, depending on their temperament.

It’s time to hold pit bull owners accountable for their dog’s aggressive behavior once again. Pit bulls were utilized as fighting animals due to the increasing frequency with which more general tendencies were observed. Dogfighting has diminished in popularity, and the number of potentially dangerous canines has decreased due to the efforts of animal rescue organizations and law enforcement agencies(Riem, 159). However, due to irresponsible property owners, the issue endures and may never be fixed. However, some individuals believe pit bulls are innately violent and deadly canines. They may bring up their lips being shut. “There is no dog with a locking jaw; this myth indicates specific breeds’ persistence.” Others may say that even though dogfighting is no longer permitted in the United States, pit bulls remain vicious. According to reliable statistical evidence:

Pit Bulls and Parolees, a popular television show, support Pit Bulls in recovering their footing by correcting the media’s long-held unfavorable perception of them. After viewing the presentation, both the dog and the parolee will gain a new purpose in life. It will teach them how to rehabilitate Pit Bulls while also supporting them in reintegrating back into society(Johnson, 8). The bulk of these dogs is reported to have been rescued after being abandoned and left to fend for themselves. Both have overcome similar challenges, evading death or facing the death penalty and receiving a second chance at life due to the compassion of others.

The euthanasia of pit bulls is a divisive topic. For decades in the United States, anime euthanasia has been a source of contention, culminating last year in a violent controversy over the rapid eradication of the Pit Bull breed. Supporters of pit bull euthanasia claim that the dogs’ antagonism and propensity for harm justify their extermination(Alonso-Recarte, 871). Media exposure has a more significant impact on risk perception than reality does. The vast majority of pit bulls are not aggressive, and those that are typically become aggressive due to negligent owners. Despite the lack of proof that pit bulls and other comparable breeds are more aggressive than other dogs, many pit bulls and related breeds are slain each year. Pit bulls should not be euthanized because they are not innately aggressive, do not have a terrible reputation due to media coverage, and do not pose a higher threat to people than other non-culled dog breeds. Pit Bulls are not born aggressive; they are born like any different breed. Pit Bulls, like other breeds, are clever, devoted, and loyal. The aggressive behavior of a dog is a result of its training.

They would abuse the dog by burning it, dangerously cutting their ears, and beating it. People began treating pit bulls in increasingly terrible ways after the century. It was just a matter of time before the media started inflating pit bull “attacks” by forgetting to disclose that the dog was usually constantly tormented and eventually attacked in self-defense. In actuality, any dog, when sufficiently furious, has the potential to cause catastrophic injury to a human. Despite their greater propensity for biting and clutching, pit bulls do not have “locking jaws.” Even if one of the dog’s owners bites the dog, the dog may still be removed from the premises(Iliopoulou et al., 334). Your primary objective should be to prevent similar awful treatment of these creatures in the future. Every day, thousands of pit bulls are slaughtered in shelters due to their media image as ferocious and unpredictable. They argue that no one would want to live alongside such a creature and hence see no reason to keep it alive when the space might be better utilized.

Physical ability and behavior are both critical aspects of any breed. A well-bred dog should have the physical qualities necessary for task execution and the required behavioral dispositions for task learning. Unsurprisingly, members of the same species have similar appearances and behaviors. According to a study, lapdogs herd more frequently than pointers, whereas sheepdogs herd more frequently than pointers. Even within the same breed or breed type, a dog’s genetic composition may incline it to particular behaviors, and there is considerable behavioral variance among them(Iliopoulou et al., 332). Additionally, many dog breeds are being produced for purposes different from those they were initially established. Numerous Golden Retriever strains, for instance, are being made as support dogs, a long cry from their original purpose of locating missing poultry.

Despite their strong attachment to their owners, I believe pit bulls are not dangerous dogs due to their devotion. While pit bulls are not very friendly to their species, they are pretty close toward people, exhibiting playfulness and friendliness. Due to their destructive tendencies, pit bulls should not be barred from coexisting in communities with other animals. Tucson’s pitbull prohibition was precipitated by unfavorable opinions about Pitbulls, terrible owners, and my personal pitbull experiences. Stereotypes frequently affect the subject under discussion, primarily because they express a negative perspective. A single ethnic group, a single cuisine, or a single animal may be the subject of a hate crime. We all have biases, and we are all guilty of objectifying a particular race of people or dog breed. For instance, pit bulls are a canine breed with a bad reputation for being “aggressive dogs.” Prejudices of this nature are detrimental to a magnificent dog breed like the Rottweiler.

Works Cited

Alonso-Recarte, Claudia. “Pit bulls and dogfighting as symbols of masculinity in hip hop culture.” Men and Masculinities 23.5 (2020): 852-871. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1097184X20965455

Iliopoulou, Maria A., Carla L. Carleton, and Laura A. Reese. “Beloved companion or problem animal: The shifting meaning of pit bull.” Society & Animals 27.3 (2019): 327-346. https://brill.com/view/journals/soan/27/3/article-p327_6.xml

Johnson, Elizabeth H. “The Pit Bull Hysteria: Is This Breed Inherently Vicious Or a Societal Projection of Unfounded Fear.” Mid-Atlantic J. on L. & Pub. Poly 4 (2018): 8. https://heinonline.org/hol-cgi-bin/get_pdf.cgi?handle=hein.journals/midatlapp4&section=5

Riem, Paige. “Breed-specific dog laws: Moving the united states away from an anti-pit bull mentality.” J. Animal & Nat. Resource L. 14 (2018): 159. https://heinonline.org/hol-cgi-bin/get_pdf.cgi?handle=hein.journals/janimlaw14&section=9

7 Planning a Nutrition Plan Name Institution Course Professor Date Planning a

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Planning a Nutrition Plan

Name

Institution

Course

Professor

Date

Planning a Nutrition Plan

Patients with diabetes, like all patients, have unique medical and nutritional needs. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that nutrition counseling be provided to all persons with diabetes. Nutrition education should include information about the principles of a healthy diet, meal planning methods such as carbohydrate counting or exchanges, label reading, and the importance of a consistent eating pattern. Individuals with diabetes should receive instruction on the appropriate use of dietary supplements, such as chromium picolinate or magnesium, which may improve metabolic control but not replace insulin therapy (Gurinović, Milešević, et al. 2018). Nutrition and diet have an essential function in managing type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the role of fats in your diet matters. A study of more than 200 patients who followed a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet for one year reveals this role’s vital role.

Participants with a low carbohydrate or high-fat diet achieved a high reduction in HbA1c levels compared to participants with a low-fat or high-carbohydrate diet despite no significant difference in average daily total energy intake among groups. The low-carbohydrate, high-fat group also had more substantial weight loss during the first 6 months, but weight loss was similar between groups at 12 months. Diabetes nutrition therapy has a vital component of the overall management plan for people with diabetes. In most cases, the individual with diabetes will meet with a registered dietitian (RD) to develop an eating plan that meets their specific needs, preferences, and lifestyle (Wołos-Kłosowicz & Bandurska-Stankiewicz, 2021). The RD will assess current food intake, medical conditions, and medications to develop an individualized diet. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition has guidelines based on: Carbohydrates should provide 45 – 60 percent of daily calories; proteins should provide 15 – 20 percent, and fats should provide 25 – 35 percent.

This needs assessment aimed to meet the need for a nutrition education program in the community. The focus of the program will be nutritional support for prediabetes and diabetes. Patients diagnosed with diabetes have higher chances of developing other diseases like heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. A healthy diet is one of the best ways to manage diabetes. This needs assessment aims to create an educational program that would help reduce high blood sugar levels in clients who are prediabetic or diabetic. The final product was a handout titled Nutrition Support for Prediabetes and Diabetes (Pomeroy-Stevens et al. 2016). This handout provides information about the relationship between food intake, exercise, and medication in managing blood sugar levels. The target audience for this handout is people ages 20-65 who are prediabetic or diabetic.

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body and converts food into energy. The food taken is changed into glucose (sugar) and taken into the bloodstream. The pancreas develops insulin, the hormone that helps glucose get into your cells and is produced as energy. Having diabetes, either the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin doesn’t function properly. Glucose builds up in the blood instead of getting into the cells. A high amount of glucose in the blood can lead to severe cases such as heart disease, blindness, or kidney failure (Thapa et al., 2021). Patients having type 1 diabetes should take insulin frequently to survive. People affected with type 2 diabetes may be able to control their diabetes with healthy eating and exercise, but sometimes medication is needed.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) aims to enhance the treatment and results for the patients having diabetes, promoting early treatment to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. NDEP seeks to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications among the American public by giving and sympathizing with patients with diabetes, those at higher risk for developing the disease, the public, and health care professionals. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) publishes the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes yearly. The named standards of care are based on the extensive review of the clinical diabetes literature, supplemented by results from ADA staff and the medical advisory committee for the Standards of Care. The Standards of Care aim is to give researchers, patients, clinicians, and payers the components of diabetes protection, general treatment goals, and guidelines.

The goal is to make sure that the patient takes the necessary drugs, controls the blood sugar level, diets according to dietary recommendations, regular exercises, and monitors blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. To provide a short-term and long-term treatment plan for the patient, support him in case of deviations from the plan and its correction, inform the patient about his state of health, and discuss areas of work that need improvement.

Diabetes education is a lifelong process for patients living with diabetes and their families. The diabetes educator provides information and support to individuals, groups, or families to help them achieve a good quality of life. The primary goal of diabetes education is to improve the health outcomes of people with diabetes. Other related goals include improving knowledge, attitudes, and skills around diabetes self-management. Increase the participation of people with diabetes in the decision-making process about their care (Miranda et al. 2020). Improve the management of chronic complications related to diabetes. To reach these goals, your goals should include a description of what you want to accomplish in terms of managing your health and a list of short-term and long-term goals that are specific, realistic, attainable, and measurable.

Nutrition is a significant component of diabetes management. Generally, nutrition plans should be individualized and consider personal preferences, medical history, comorbid conditions, and medications that might affect food choices. Many people with diabetes manage their condition by counting carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the primary source of energy. Foods having carbohydrates include starches, sugars, fruits, sweets, and milk. When people with diabetes eat foods that contain carbs, their blood sugar rises (Coile et al., 2021). A diet plan helps one decide on the type of food they can choose to take at meals. Many people find it helpful to plan their carbohydrate intake for the day. This involves making a list of carb-containing foods you would like to eat for each meal or snack and adding up the total carbs in those choices. By keeping track of how many carbs you have eaten throughout the day, you will know when to stop adding more carbs to your diet for that day.

In conclusion, having a nutrition plan is not an easy thing. It’s hard to know what one should eat and when to eat it. A nutrition plan will be best if one finds healthy meals that are easy to prepare and keep your blood sugar under control. The nutrition care provider can help people develop a safe and effective plan for a diabetes meal program that fits their lifestyle, tastes, budget, and nutritional needs. If someone has the right attitude and follows the guidelines of the nutrition plan, one achieves optimum health in time. Nutritional management of diabetes is essential since many risk factors for type 2 diabetes are modifiable by diet and lifestyle changes. A nutrition education program remains an integral part of diabetes treatment and has been demonstrated to improve glycemic control and delay progression to macro-vascular disease. However, there is limited research on the acceptability and effectiveness of nutrition education programs targeting diabetes in Asian Indians.

Reference

Coile, A., Wun, J., Kothari, M. T., Hemminger, C., Fracassi, P., & Di Dio, D. (2021). Scaling up nutrition through multisectoral planning: An exploratory review of 26 national nutrition plans. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 17(4), e13225.

Gosmanov, A. R., & Umpierrez, G. E. (2012). Medical nutrition therapy in hospitalized patients with diabetes. Current diabetes reports, 12(1), 93-100.

Gurinović, M., Milešević, J., Kadvan, A., Nikolić, M., Zeković, M., Djekić-Ivanković, M., … & Glibetić, M. (2018). Development, features, and application of DIET ASSESS & PLAN (DAP) software in supporting public health nutrition research in Central Eastern European Countries (CEEC). Food Chemistry, 238, 186-194.

Manorat, R., Rana, Y., Borces, K., Becker, L., & Flory, A. (2020). How are countries planning for the costs of nutrition data and information systems?. Gates Open Research, 4.

Miranda, D., Breda, J., Cardoso, R., Gonçalves, N., Caldas, A. C., & Ferreira, J. J. (2020). Should the Energy Contribution of Commercial Thickeners Be Considered in the Nutrition Plan of Patients With Dysphagia?. Nutrition in Clinical Practice, 35(4), 649-654.

Pomeroy-Stevens, A., Shrestha, M. B., Biradavolu, M., Hachhethu, K., Houston, R., Sharma, I., & Wun, J. (2016). Prioritizing and funding Nepal’s multisector nutrition plan. Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 37(4_suppl), S151-S169.

Ruducha, J., Bhatia, A., Mann, C., & Torlesse, H. (2022). Multisectoral nutrition planning in Nepal: evidence from organizational network analysis. Maternal & child nutrition, 18, e13112.

Thapa, B., Shrestha, M. L., Poudel, B., Khadka, G., Banjade, B., & Cunningham, K. (2021). Integration of family planning in nutrition programming: experiences from the Suaahara II program in Nepal. Field Exchange 64, 10.

Wołos-Kłosowicz, K., & Bandurska-Stankiewicz, E. (2021). Effects of common weight loss plan on diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors. Primary Care Diabetes

Mata, F., Torres-Ruiz, M., Zagal, R., Guzman, G., Moreno-Ibarra, M., & Quintero, R. (2018). A cross-domain framework for designing mobile healthcare applications mining social networks to generate training and nutrition planning recommendations. Telematics and Informatics, 35(4), 837-853.

2 Planning a Nutrition Plan Name Institution Course Professor Date Planning a

2

Planning a Nutrition Plan

Name

Institution

Course

Professor

Date

Planning a Nutrition Plan

Patients with diabetes, like all patients, have unique medical and nutritional needs. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that nutrition counseling be provided to all persons with diabetes. Nutrition education should include information about the principles of a healthy diet, meal planning methods such as carbohydrate counting or exchanges, label reading, and the importance of a consistent eating pattern. Individuals with diabetes should receive instruction on the appropriate use of dietary supplements, such as chromium picolinate or magnesium, which may improve metabolic control but not replace insulin therapy (Gurinović, Milešević, et al. 2018). Nutrition and diet play an important role in managing type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the role of fats in your diet matters. A study of more than 200 patients who followed a low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet or a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet for one year reveals how vital this role is.

Participants with a low carbohydrate or high-fat diet achieved a high reduction in HbA1c levels compared to participants with a low-fat or high-carbohydrate diet despite no significant difference in average daily total energy intake among groups. The low-carbohydrate, high-fat group also had more substantial weight loss during the first 6 months, but weight loss was similar between groups at 12 months. Diabetes nutrition therapy has a vital component of the overall management plan for people with diabetes. In most cases, the individual with diabetes will meet with a registered dietitian (RD) to develop an eating plan that meets their specific needs, preferences, and lifestyle (Wołos-Kłosowicz & Bandurska-Stankiewicz, 2021). The RD will assess current food intake, medical conditions, and medications to develop an individualized diet. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition has guidelines based on: Carbohydrates should provide 45 – 60 percent of daily calories; proteins should provide 15 – 20 percent, and fats should provide 25 – 35 percent.

This needs assessment aimed to meet the need for a nutrition education program in the community. The focus of the program will be nutritional support for prediabetes and diabetes. Patients diagnosed with diabetes have a higher chance of developing other diseases such as heart disease, kidney failure, and stroke. A healthy diet is one of the best ways to manage diabetes. This needs assessment aims to create an educational program that would help reduce high blood sugar levels in clients who are prediabetic or diabetic. The final product was a handout titled Nutrition Support for Prediabetes and Diabetes (Pomeroy-Stevens et al. 2016). This handout provides information about the relationship between food intake, exercise, and medication in managing blood sugar levels. The target audience for this handout is people ages 20-65 who are prediabetic or diabetic.

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body and converts food into energy. The food taken is changed into glucose (sugar) and taken into the bloodstream. The pancreas develops insulin, a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to be used as energy. With diabetes, either the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin doesn’t function properly. Glucose builds up in the blood instead of getting into the cells. High glucose in the blood can lead to severe problems such as heart disease, blindness, or kidney failure (Thapa et al., 2021). Patients having type 1 diabetes should take insulin frequently to survive. People affected with type 2 diabetes may be able to control their diabetes with healthy eating and exercise, but sometimes medication is needed.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) aims to improve the treatment and outcomes for patients with diabetes, promoting early diagnosis to avoid or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. NDEP seeks to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications among the American public by giving and sympathizing with patients with diabetes, those at higher risk for developing the disease, health care professionals, and the public. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) publishes the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes yearly. The named standards of care are based on the extensive review of the clinical diabetes literature, supplemented by input from ADA staff and the medical advisory committee for the Standards of Care. The Standards of Care are intended to give clinicians, patients, researchers, and payers the components of diabetes care, general treatment goals, and guidelines.

The goal is to make sure that the patient takes the necessary drugs, controls the blood sugar level, diets according to dietary recommendations, regular exercises, and monitors blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. To provide a short-term and long-term treatment plan for the patient, support him in case of deviations from the plan and its correction, inform the patient about his state of health, and discuss areas of work that need improvement.

Diabetes education is a lifelong process for patients living with diabetes and their families. The diabetes educator provides information and support to individuals, groups, or families to help them achieve a good quality of life. The primary goal of diabetes education is to improve the health outcomes of people with diabetes. Other related goals include improving knowledge, attitudes, and skills around diabetes self-management. Increase the participation of people with diabetes in the decision-making process about their care (Miranda et al. 2020). Improve the management of chronic complications related to diabetes. To reach these goals, your goals should include a description of what you want to accomplish in terms of managing your health and a list of short-term and long-term goals that are specific, realistic, attainable, and measurable.

Nutrition is a significant component of diabetes management. Generally, nutrition plans should be individualized and consider personal preferences, medical history, comorbid conditions, and medications that might affect food choices. Many people with diabetes manage their condition by counting carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the primary source of energy. Foods having carbohydrates include starches, sugars, fruits, sweets, and milk. When people with diabetes eat foods that contain carbs, their blood sugar rises (Coile et al., 2021). A diet plan helps one decide on the type of food they can choose to take at meals. Many people find it helpful to plan their carbohydrate intake for the day. This involves making a list of carb-containing foods you would like to eat for each meal or snack and adding up the total carbs in those choices. By keeping track of how many carbs you have eaten throughout the day, you will know when to stop adding more carbs to your diet for that day.

In conclusion, having a nutrition plan is not an easy thing. It’s hard to know what one should eat and when to eat it. A nutrition plan will be best if one finds healthy meals that are easy to prepare and keep your blood sugar under control. The nutrition care provider can help people develop a safe and effective plan for a diabetes meal program that fits their lifestyle, tastes, budget, and nutritional needs. If someone has the right attitude and follows the guidelines of the nutrition plan, one achieves optimum health in time. Nutritional management of diabetes is essential since many risk factors for type 2 diabetes are modifiable by diet and lifestyle changes. A nutrition education program remains an integral part of diabetes treatment and has been demonstrated to improve glycemic control and delay progression to macro-vascular disease. However, there is limited research on the acceptability and effectiveness of nutrition education programs targeting diabetes in Asian Indians.

Reference

Coile, A., Wun, J., Kothari, M. T., Hemminger, C., Fracassi, P., & Di Dio, D. (2021). Scaling up nutrition through multisectoral planning: An exploratory review of 26 national nutrition plans. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 17(4), e13225.

Gosmanov, A. R., & Umpierrez, G. E. (2012). Medical nutrition therapy in hospitalized patients with diabetes. Current diabetes reports, 12(1), 93-100.

Gurinović, M., Milešević, J., Kadvan, A., Nikolić, M., Zeković, M., Djekić-Ivanković, M., … & Glibetić, M. (2018). Development, features, and application of DIET ASSESS & PLAN (DAP) software in supporting public health nutrition research in Central Eastern European Countries (CEEC). Food Chemistry, 238, 186-194.

Manorat, R., Rana, Y., Borces, K., Becker, L., & Flory, A. (2020). How are countries planning for the costs of nutrition data and information systems?. Gates Open Research, 4.

Miranda, D., Breda, J., Cardoso, R., Gonçalves, N., Caldas, A. C., & Ferreira, J. J. (2020). Should the Energy Contribution of Commercial Thickeners Be Considered in the Nutrition Plan of Patients With Dysphagia?. Nutrition in Clinical Practice, 35(4), 649-654.

Pomeroy-Stevens, A., Shrestha, M. B., Biradavolu, M., Hachhethu, K., Houston, R., Sharma, I., & Wun, J. (2016). Prioritizing and funding Nepal’s multisector nutrition plan. Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 37(4_suppl), S151-S169.

Ruducha, J., Bhatia, A., Mann, C., & Torlesse, H. (2022). Multisectoral nutrition planning in Nepal: evidence from organizational network analysis. Maternal & child nutrition, 18, e13112.

Thapa, B., Shrestha, M. L., Poudel, B., Khadka, G., Banjade, B., & Cunningham, K. (2021). Integration of family planning in nutrition programming: experiences from the Suaahara II program in Nepal. Field Exchange 64, 10.

Wołos-Kłosowicz, K., & Bandurska-Stankiewicz, E. (2021). Effects of common weight loss plan on diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors. Primary Care Diabetes

Mata, F., Torres-Ruiz, M., Zagal, R., Guzman, G., Moreno-Ibarra, M., & Quintero, R. (2018). A cross-domain framework for designing mobile healthcare applications mining social networks to generate training and nutrition planning recommendations. Telematics and Informatics, 35(4), 837-853.