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Robert Frost Home Burial – A Reflection of Reality

Home Burial as a Reflection of Reality

Robert Frost’s “Home Burial” is a masterfully written work, conceived from his and his wife’s anguish at the loss of their first-born son as well as from the estrangement between his sister-in-law and her husband due to the death of their child. In Donald J. Greiner’s commentary on Frost’s works, “The Indespensible Robert Frost,” it is revealed that “Mrs. Frost could not ease her grief following Elliot’s death, and Frost later reported that she knew then that the world was evil. Amy in “Home Burial” makes the same observati Often it seems that writers have their own personal inspiration that fuels a great work to cause its readers to realize the complexity of the human nature. Robert Frost’s “Home Burial” is a masterfully written example of such works, conceived from his and his wife’s anguish at the loss of their first-born son as well as from the estrangement between his sister-in-law and her husband due to the death of their child. In Donald J. Greiner’s commentary on Frost’s works, “The Indespensible Robert Frost,” it is revealed that “Mrs. Frost could not ease her grief following Elliot’s death, and Frost later reported that she knew then that the world was evil. Amy in “Home Burial” makes the same observation”. “Home Burial” illustrates the cause of the failing marriage as a breakdown of communication, both verbally and physically, between two people who adopt totally different views in the midst of crisis.

Amy does not believe that her husband is in mourning over the death of their child. Her view can be defended by the fact that she is feeling unimaginable pain that she justly feels is unique to the nurturing nature of a mother. The child tha…

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…eir ability to talk normally to eachother, but also because the physical side of their marriage is absent. Touch is a form of communication that the total absence of alone can destroy a loving union. Frost leaves the reader with a realistically portrayed image of their marital turmoil reaching a height as Amy opens the door, ready to walk out on the marriage. The melancholy conclusion to Frost’s work ends up being the result of failed communication.

“Home Burial” is unfortunately a reflection of the reality that many marriages fail in the event of a child’s death. A lack of communication, both verbally and physically, tears apart two people even without a tragedy as profound as the one that Frost and his wife experienced. Frost’s work is an expression of the more serious and traumatic side of nature and reveals the consequences of inevitable human flaws.

Shakespeare’s King Lear – Goneril and Cordelia in King Lear

The Characters of Goneril and Cordelia in King Lear

Nothing makes a story like a good villain, or in this case, good villainess. They are the people we love to hate and yearn to watch burn. Goneril, of Shakespeare’s King Lear, is no exception. Her evils flamed from the very beginning of the play with her lack of sincerity in professing her love for her father:

“Sir, I love you more than word can wield the matter; Dearer than eyesight, space, and liberty; Beyond what can be valued, rich or rare; No less than life, with grace, health, beauty, honour; As much as child e’er loved, or father found; A love that makes breath poor, and speech unable. Beyond all manner of so much I love you. (I.i. 56-62)

One can just feel the insincerity and exaggeration in her words, perhaps even a touch of hatred that is bubbling like a volcano on the verge of explosion, which will wreak destruction on everyone and everything that gets in its path.

Of course, Shakespeare does not disappoint. The volcano is actually a good analogy for this character, for she does exactly what is expected. Not only does her father feel her wrath, but also her own husband, the Duke of Albany, who she has killed; The Duke of Gloucester whose eyes get gauged out in her presence; her other sister, Regan, who she kills out of jealousy; and Goneril, herself, when she comes face to face with her true self.

In regard to her role in the Elizabethan age, Goneril not only stood for evil, but also rebellion. She has rebelled against the accepted role for women by rebelling against both her father and husband. This reflects much of the theme of the play in that rebellion against accepted social order under mines that order, which leads to downfall and chaos. Ag…

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…h the wicked prosper, and the virtuous miscarry . . . the audience will not always rise better pleased from the final triumph of persecuted virtue.”

What exactly was Cordelia’s role in the play? Was she there as an angel – like character who made the distinction between good and evil more visible? Was she just thrown in as a little goody- goody who did no wrong, and maybe, to some degree, we were supposed to despise? Or was she there to make us more aware of a crumbling society where many things were opposite to what one might think it should be, with evil generally prevailing over the good (which to some degree is prophetic to today’s society)? There are many theories surrounding this character in particular, and no one has reached a definitive conclusion as of late. The best one I can come up with, however, is simply the answer “Yes,” to all of the above.

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