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please. This is business u miami business school application essays

I want you to show – in the writing- most perfect fabricated story for the University Grad Mba admissions. You can write anything you want if you believe the admissions like most. Questions are for grad school MBA admission. I male 23 years old , born and raised in Istanbul to Spanish Mother and Turkish Father. I majored in Biochemistry. (If you use it)

Questions are :

I. Complete the following three application essays (300 words/essay)

1.Pick 1 of 4 University’s pillars (global, technology, sustainability, diversity). Share an accomplishment of how you’ve made an impact in one of these areas.

2.How have you demonstrated grit? Provide an example of a time when you’ve had to overcome a hardship or diversity. What did you learn?

3.How will Miami Herbert shape your short and long-term goals and feed your intellectual curiosity?

II

1. II. Optional Scholarship Question Essay (475word)

At Our university mba grad school, we believe your tomorrow starts here. As a mission-driven institution that is strongly rooted in our commitment to our values:

What values inform your tomorrow?
What values do you/will you bring to the University Business Grad school community?

2 Paired Reading Paired reading is a research-based approach for teaching fluency

2

Paired Reading

Paired reading is a research-based approach for teaching fluency to learners. In this reading strategy, learners are often encouraged to read aloud to one another. The fluent readers are usually partnered with the less fluent readers when employing patterns (TITA, 2018). In addition, learners on the same level are paired to reread a story they have already read. Paired reading is an excellent approach to help children become independent readers and is beneficial in assisting them to succeed in their reading. Instead of focusing on children’s failures, paired reading tries to increase readers achievement and positive reading attitudes.

Section 1: Background of The Child

Ben is a six-year-old boy. His school was worried since he could not concentrate on classwork and assignments. Despite possessing an above-average IQ and language aptitude, Ben was not succeeding. Ben was later diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. He struggles with writing and becomes irritated when he makes mistakes. He appears to be “in his own universe” and is uninterested in meeting new friends. Ben’s parents indicate that if anything isn’t correct, he becomes upset and obsessed with perfectionism and routine. He is particularly drawn to animal-related stories. Ben’s health in school is excellent, and he is hardly ever absent due to an illness.

Section Two: Type of Book for Paired Reading

I would recommend the book entitled ‘Are you Ready to Play Outside’. The tale in the book is about Gerald, the elephant, and his close pal piggie. Due to Ben’s love for animals, I believe the book would be ideal for him and I am confident he would truly enjoy reading it. The storybook contains numerous repeated sentences and is written in plain language.

Discuss the importance of:

Cooperation between the child and the teacher

The bond between a child and their teacher is critical to their academic performance. Creating healthy relationships during partnered reading allows autistic students to feel more at ease in the classroom (TITA, 2018). Many studies have found that teacher-child collaboration improves a child’s development, including social-emotional, cognitive, and language skills.

Appropriateness of the book, i.e., visuals and content, graphic design

‘Are you ready to play outside?’ novel features short stories with a few texts on each page, and the story’s ‘big words’ are suited for young children to read. According to the book’s author, the report also keeps children entertained and teaches them the value of friendship, caring for one another, and working together.

Suited To Ability, Simple, Repetitive, And Stage Appropriate.

The storybook has many repeated phrases and has a simple language. The characters too, are endearing keeping children animated. The novel gives the readers abilities to value of friendship, take care of each other and work together. The book is also decorated with appealing color changes, for example, the word balloon between Piggie and Gerald. Furthermore, the children can easily read the story quickly, thus alleviating boredom.

Follows child’s interests and choices

Following children’s reading interests and choices significantly impacts their reading skills and attitudes. Firstly, following a child’s interest piques their curiosity and inspires their imaginations. The youngster can easily learn the distinctions between reality and beliefs. Furthermore, following a child’s choices and interests aids in the development of the child’s brain, concentration, and ability to focus. As a result, teachers and parents should be encouraged to engage children in reading for proper communication and social skills development.

Assistive technology

Assistive technology for children with the autistic spectrum can be beneficial in various ways. For example, ‘Argumentative and alternative communication’ technology aids persons of all ages by increasing communication, social contacts and fostering child’s independence.

Section 3: Factors to Be Considered Before conducting paired

Collaboration

Collaboration is an effective factor to be considered in pairing readers with autism. Teachers pair low-fluent learners with partners who possess high reading fluency through collaboration methods.

Group same level

The child’s level is a critical factor in paired reading. Pairing Ben with a child who shares the same reading level will assist Ben in becoming an independent reader.

Supporting the curriculum

The supporting curriculum helps teachers achieve their goals in all areas. As a result, teachers assist autistic learners like Ben in developing reading abilities that will allow them to understand the source of the materials and successfully use them to support their views.

Positive adult engagement and support

Paired reading works best when parents encourage their children to read. The task is effective for youngsters who engage with adults during the process. The interaction of adults in pair reading is important to consider before undertaking the reading. Adults provide vital support to struggling children, allowing them to enjoy materials or reading resources that they cannot read independently.

Learning outcomes

Before beginning the paired reading activity, I would create questions for students to respond to once they finished reading. The discussion question may require them to assess what they read concerning the story by identifying the major theme in the storybook or retelling the story to other classmates. I will lead a class discussion about positive approaches to help and correct Ben, rather than recommending and clarifying phrases.

Section 4: Benefits of Paired Reading

Children with autism spectrum disorder frequently have delays in literacy and early language abilities. Paired reading assists in the child’s disability and gaining proficiency; the paired reading method used by the teachers’ aids in the interaction between the kid and adults (Boyle et al., 2019). Also, paired reading creates enjoyment and knowledge of the subject; enhancing this strategy may help Ben discover the lesson as a pleasure and enhances his social skills. Reading will physically benefit Ben since he will easily connect with his parents by reading the book. Furthermore, paired reading aids in the development of language and social abilities paired reading will help Ben deal with his autism by collaborating with other people, thus fostering their interactions.

Other Factors to Be Considered During Activity

Safety/hygiene of equipment, i.e., book, technology

The reading materials used by autistic people should be clean. Autistic children exhibit sensory impairments, such as a heightened sense of touch or scent. As a result, to help Ben read effectively, I will maintain proper hygiene.

Environment – seating, space, noise, lighting, comfort.

Setting up a classroom for autism through paired reading procedures promotes skill acquisition, independence and reduces anxiety and tension. I would provide a well-designed area with clearly defined visual clues to boost Ben’s independence. I will make sure the classroom is bright with subtle colors and patterns that appeal to Ben. In addition, during partnered learning, I will pay attention to the learners’ sensory concerns, such as lighting, and I will position Ben’s desk away from the door or windows to avoid lighting interruptions. Second, many learners with autism have trouble grasping space, so I will define space for Ben by creating outlines on the floor with masking tape. I will also maintain Ben’s comfort by providing diverse locations for interacting with different kids.

Familiarizing Self with Activity

Familiarizing oneself with the reading activity is an essential component before paired reading. I will read the book before the partnered task to acquire new concepts and uncover exciting areas in the story. Familiarizing myself with the book will help me review the schematics, illustrations, and pictures to determine the usefulness of the book.

Reflection On the Task in A Hypothetical Sense

Describe What You Did in The Reading Activity in Full

During the paired reading process, I first built a routine for learners to follow and understand the procedures required for the reading engagement. Secondly, I gave the students an error-correction approach to use when helping each other with their reading. Third, I modeled the steps to ensure students understood the technique. Finally, I paired the kids based on their reading levels and selected a suitable tale book based on their ability.

What did you learn about the child?

Interacting with Ben helped me have a thorough understanding of the autism spectrum. I discovered that autistic children have a penchant for detecting patterns and details. For example, Ben could acquire numbers, shapes, and letters in the storybook faster than other children of his age. During the paired reading session, I discovered that Ben could see different hidden patterns in the animal photographs that his peers could not see.

What did you learn about self – SNA role & skills

As a special needs assistant, I gained knowledge and a greater level of competency in interpersonal and communication skills. I can consider myself a skilled communicator who can easily encourage, motivate, and inspire disabled individuals. I also learned how to develop connections with others and solve problems.

Importance of paired reading,

Pair reading helps students with autism practice their literacy skills and gives teachers chances to observe students personally. Teachers offer assistance to individual readers in case of a common mistake. Also, reading with partners encourages the students to read materials above their reading levels (Boyle et al., 2019). Finally, pair reading provides a humble time for discussion about the story or comprehension, thus helping the students actively participate in the learning activities.

The importance of promoting independence

During the paired reading, I learned that promoting independence was particularly important to Ben. He developed self-esteem and perseverance in school as a result of his independence. Ben interacted with other learners by giving his opinion on the story during the class discussion. He developed the belief in his ability and the desire to take care of himself due to promoting independence, making him more resilient to external changes in the classroom. Finally, Ben was able to adopt empathy and self-awareness toward his classmates.

References

Boyle, S. A., McNaughton, D., & Chapin, S. E. (2019). Effects of shared reading on the early language and literacy skills of children with autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 34(4), 205-214.

TITA, N. (2018). THE EFFECTIVENES OF PAIRED READING METHOD IN TEACHING READING COMPREHENSION OF NARRATIVE TEXT (An Experimental Research at First Grade of SMK 19 Maret Kadu Hejo Pandeglang) (Doctoral dissertation, Universitas Islam Negeri” Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin” Banten).

5 Paper Critique Name Institutional Affiliation Course Instructor Date Paper Critique Research

please. This is business u miami business school application essays Writing Assignment Help 5

Paper Critique

Name

Institutional Affiliation

Course

Instructor

Date

Paper Critique

Research paper Title

Assessing Understanding and Obtaining Consent from Adults with Intellectual Disabilities for a Health Promotion Study, published in 2013 by Willi Horner-Johnson and Danielle Bailey.

Summary of the article

The article talks of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities of their perceived inability to provide informed permission being left out in research studies. To make an educated choice about participating in research, one must be able to comprehend the study’s description and the relevant disclosures. Participants in a study with intellectual disabilities were asked to respond to questions about key aspects of the study disclosures, and the authors were interested in determining whether or not those with disabilities were able to answer all of the questions correctly. They also wanted to see if some issues were more difficult to comprehend than others. It was determined that persons with intellectual impairments were able to answer questions regarding the most important parts of a health promotion study by piloting a set of questions. All of the questions were properly answered by more than half of the participants. Most difficult for individuals who couldn’t answer all of the questions was recognizing possible dangers of participating in this research. Most of those with intellectual impairments can provide their own permission to take part in low-risk trials, the data show.

Purpose of the study

To prove the capacity of the intellectually impaired adults in providing informed concent.

Participants

The study involved a number of 133 participants. Those who participated in the research were healthy people with intellectual impairments. As part of the research, participants were randomly assigned to receive one of two health promotion programs tailored specifically for persons with impairments. It was largely a learning experience with a little amount of exercise thrown in. Non-invasive measures were used in the study. In this regard, the research is deemed to be low risk. A total of 131 agreed to respond to the questions asked while the remaining two were exempted from the study.

Data collection method

This was achieved through interviews with the individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Participants who indicated interest in participating in the research during the recruiting phase were contacted individually by study personnel. Meetings might be held in person or over the phone, depending on the situation. After two tries, individuals that were unable to respond to questions were omitted from the research.

Results of the study

As a result, two people were precluded from participating in a health promotion research. They were all willing to take part in the research and were all given permission to do so. Of them, 75 (more than 50%) were able to correctly answer all six questions about the study’s procedures. An ARR was required for those who had difficulties answering one or more questions and so were much more likely to be living with relatives or in a foster or foster home than in an independent house or apartment for this research to be conducted. In terms of age, sex, marital status, or educational attainment, there were no significant variations in the number of people who needed an ARR and those who didn’t. ARRs and people with intellectual disabilities did not dispute over whether or not to participate in the research.

More over half of the participants were able to show that they had grasped the study’s main points. These findings show that study disclosures may be understood by persons with ID if they are offered in Basic English as part of a conversation with prospective research participants.

Importance of the findings

According to the article, a wide range of persons, including those who have a disability, should be included in study samples. This will be vital to the society as the initial perception towards people with intellectual disabilities shall be changed. It will be clear to the society that People with intellectual disabilities should not be assumed to be incapable of giving their informed consent to study, but researchers may take efforts to ensure that they are. An essential initial step is to evaluate how well participants comprehended the study’s disclosures. Many persons with ID are capable of making their own decisions, according to our research. Surrogate consent, advocates, and adjustments to consent forms may be used when comprehension is restricted.

Reference

Horner‐Johnson, W., & Bailey, D. (2013). Assessing understanding and obtaining consent from adults with intellectual disabilities for a health promotion study. Journal of policy and practice in intellectual disabilities, 10(3), 260-265. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jppi.12048?casa_token=SAzH9jukOLQAAAAA:_VGAvoUs99bnEjiO25nPUK3QZX7BHTUFsIEGUYG6tw8Nv7Z0bA3urT9OXdXfErjCbRc2pb4IVzhJYBiNlw

1 Parents Name Institution Affiliation Course Professor Date Parents Q1. Higher-level thinking

1

Parents

Name

Institution Affiliation

Course

Professor Date

Parents

Q1. Higher-level thinking

Adolescence is a time of rapid cognitive development because of how brain changes interact with growing up, learning, and making friends. Changes in adolescents’ thinking, judgment, and comprehension are more dramatic than physical changes (Lumen, 2021). The formal operational stage of cognitive development is a change from thinking and reasoning logically about the concrete, observable events to thinking and reasoning logically about abstract concepts. The higher-level thinking influences adolescents academic and social development since they can make better decisions, have moral reasoning, intuitive and analytical thinking, and have hypothetical thinking. They can perform better in school and make friends that align with their values and goals. Parents, caregivers, and teachers can do a lot to encourage higher-level thinking, especially when answering children’s questions. While answering questions, they should ensure to use the best way to answer them and encourage them to consider alternative explanations, evaluate them, and follow up on the evaluation.

Q2. Marcia’s identity stages

Marcia’s identity formation stages include diffusion, foreclosure, moratorium, and achievement.

Diffusion

Identity diffusion describes young people who are yet to discover or commit to a certain identity. As a result, this identification condition suggests a lack of investigation and dedication (Morelli, 2022). There has been no consideration of who they are or what they want to do with their lives for these youngsters. Instead of anticipating what will happen next, they respond to the events unfolding before them. Parents can encourage students at this stage by encouraging them to seek their identity and supporting them emotionally and financially.

Foreclosure

Low exploration yet high devotion are the main characteristics of this status. Adolescents aren’t actively trying to discover what matters to them during this identification period. However, these young people do not examine why they are doing what they are doing or look for alternatives. Parents of these students can help by challenging them to learn more about the morals and values they adapt.

Moratorium

When one is in this identification stage, they are open to trying new things, but they are not all that invested in the outcome (Morelli, 2022). As a result, they haven’t decided who they want to be yet and aren’t ruling anything out. At this stage, the parents can help students by helping them rule out less suitable options.

Identity Achievement

This level of identification denotes a thorough exploration and a strong commitment. Many young people have formed a strong sense of self-identity by exploring their beliefs, values, and life priorities. To fully achieve this type of identity, young people need parents’ guidance and support and to be positive and secure in their own judgments and values.

Q3. Atkinson, Morten, and Sue’s model

There are five main minority identity development stages which include:

Conformity

Dissonance

Resistance and immersion

Introspection

Synergistic, articulation, and awareness

Young people may see themselves as part of the minority group in contrast to the dominant White majority in the first phase, which is conformity, and there is a possibility that they see White folks as superior and develop a negative attitude about themselves and other Blacks. In the second stage, dissonance, people grow angry when they realize that society is not fair (Robinson, 2011). Racism and the irrational lack of respect that people of a certain race receive from others can affect young Black children.  In the third step, Resistance and immersion, those in the minority group begin to take action to combat specific injustices. Angry feelings are prevalent in this period.

They grow increasingly attentive and introspective about their differences from the dominant culture as they progress through the fourth stage, introspection. For example, many young Black people nowadays are more concerned with promoting Black pride than opposing White culture. In the final stage, Synergistic, articulation, and awareness, minority members value their own culture and traditions while also being more understanding of the needs of other minority groups. The total impact of past and current racism is kept in context, even if Black youth have a selective view of Whites, seeing some as good and others as cruel.

Q4. Risky behaviors adolescents are likely to encounter

When it comes to seeking new experiences, it is normal for teenagers to do so, which can be upsetting for parents. Planning and impulse control are not fully developed in the teenage brain until roughly 25 years old (raisingchildren.net.au, 2017). Therefore, kids are more inclined than adults to make impulsive decisions without understanding the ramifications in their full depths. Teenagers may engage in potentially hazardous behaviors to be accepted by their peers. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, use of drugs and substances, trespassing, vandalism, reckless driving, fighting, and absenteeism are examples of risky behavior.

There are different ways in which parents can protect their adolescent children from risks which include talking about the repercussions and behavior of one’s actions might assist a child in understanding the degree of danger involved in certain situations, working with your child on the rules and penalties for breaking them will help them to better adhere to them, keeping tabs on your child’s whereabouts and who she is with can help keep her safe, keeping in touch with your children, assisting children in coping with the pressures of socializing.

References

Lumen. (2021). Cognitive Development in Adolescence | Lifespan Development. Courses.lumenlearning.com. https://courses.lumenlearning.com/wmopen-lifespandevelopment/chapter/cognitive-development-in-adolescence/

Morelli, A. (2022). James Marcia and Self-Identity – Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24). Www.gracepointwellness.org. https://www.gracepointwellness.org/1310-child-development-theory-adolescence-12-24/article/41164-james-marcia-and-self-identity

raisingchildren.net.au. (2017, July 3). Risky behavior in teenagers: how to handle it. Raising Children Network. https://raisingchildren.net.au/teens/behaviour/behaviour-questions-issues/risky-behaviour

Robinson, M. (2011, April 10). Racial Identity Development. Student Development Theory Overview; Student Development Theory Overview. https://studentdevelopmenttheory.wordpress.com/racial-identity-development/

6 Parents Name Institution Affiliation Course Professor Date Parents Q1. Higher-level thinking

6

Parents

Name

Institution Affiliation

Course

Professor Date

Parents

Q1. Higher-level thinking

Adolescence is a time of rapid cognitive development because of how brain changes interact with growing up, learning, and making friends. Changes in adolescents’ thinking, judgment, and comprehension are more dramatic than physical changes (Lumen, 2021). The formal operational stage of cognitive development is a change from thinking and reasoning logically about the concrete, observable events to thinking and reasoning logically about abstract concepts. The higher-level thinking influences adolescents academic and social development since they can make better decisions, have moral reasoning, intuitive and analytical thinking, and have hypothetical thinking. They can perform better in school and make friends that align with their values and goals. Parents, caregivers, and teachers can do a lot to encourage higher-level thinking, especially when answering children’s questions. While answering questions, they should ensure to use the best way to answer them and encourage them to consider alternative explanations, evaluate them, and follow up on the evaluation.

Q2. Marcia’s identity stages

Marcia’s identity formation stages include diffusion, foreclosure, moratorium, and achievement.

Diffusion

Identity diffusion describes young people who are yet to discover or commit to a certain identity. As a result, this identification condition suggests a lack of investigation and dedication (Morelli, 2022). There has been no consideration of who they are or what they want to do with their lives for these youngsters. Instead of anticipating what will happen next, they respond to the events unfolding before them. Parents can encourage students at this stage by encouraging them to seek their identity and supporting them emotionally and financially.

Foreclosure

Low exploration yet high devotion are the main characteristics of this status. Adolescents aren’t actively trying to discover what matters to them during this identification period. However, these young people do not examine why they are doing what they are doing or look for alternatives. Parents of these students can help by challenging them to learn more about the morals and values they adapt.

Moratorium

When one is in this identification stage, they are open to trying new things, but they are not all that invested in the outcome (Morelli, 2022). As a result, they haven’t decided who they want to be yet and aren’t ruling anything out. At this stage, the parents can help students by helping them rule out less suitable options.

Identity Achievement

This level of identification denotes a thorough exploration and a strong commitment. Many young people have formed a strong sense of self-identity by exploring their beliefs, values, and life priorities. To fully achieve this type of identity, young people need parents’ guidance and support and to be positive and secure in their own judgments and values.

Q3. Atkinson, Morten, and Sue’s model

There are five main minority identity development stages which include:

Conformity

Dissonance

Resistance and immersion

Introspection

Synergistic, articulation, and awareness

Young people may see themselves as part of the minority group in contrast to the dominant White majority in the first phase, which is conformity, and there is a possibility that they see White folks as superior and develop a negative attitude about themselves and other Blacks. In the second stage, dissonance, people grow angry when they realize that society is not fair (Robinson, 2011). Racism and the irrational lack of respect that people of a certain race receive from others can affect young Black children.  In the third step, Resistance and immersion, those in the minority group begin to take action to combat specific injustices. Angry feelings are prevalent in this period.

They grow increasingly attentive and introspective about their differences from the dominant culture as they progress through the fourth stage, introspection. For example, many young Black people nowadays are more concerned with promoting Black pride than opposing White culture. In the final stage, Synergistic, articulation, and awareness, minority members value their own culture and traditions while also being more understanding of the needs of other minority groups. The total impact of past and current racism is kept in context, even if Black youth have a selective view of Whites, seeing some as good and others as cruel.

Q4. Risky behaviors adolescents are likely to encounter

When it comes to seeking new experiences, it is normal for teenagers to do so, which can be upsetting for parents. Planning and impulse control are not fully developed in the teenage brain until roughly 25 years old (raisingchildren.net.au, 2017). Therefore, kids are more inclined than adults to make impulsive decisions without understanding the ramifications in their full depths. Teenagers may engage in potentially hazardous behaviors to be accepted by their peers. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, use of drugs and substances, trespassing, vandalism, reckless driving, fighting, and absenteeism are examples of risky behavior.

There are different ways in which parents can protect their adolescent children from risks which include talking about the repercussions and behavior of one’s actions might assist a child in understanding the degree of danger involved in certain situations, settings rules and penalties for not adhering to them them will help them to better adhere to them, keeping tabs on your child’s whereabouts and who she is with can help keep her safe, keeping in touch with your children, assisting children in coping with the pressures of socializing.

References

Lumen. (2021). Cognitive Development in Adolescence | Lifespan Development. Courses.lumenlearning.com. https://courses.lumenlearning.com/wmopen-lifespandevelopment/chapter/cognitive-development-in-adolescence/

Morelli, A. (2022). James Marcia and Self-Identity – Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24). Www.gracepointwellness.org. https://www.gracepointwellness.org/1310-child-development-theory-adolescence-12-24/article/41164-james-marcia-and-self-identity

raisingchildren.net.au. (2017, July 3). Risky behavior in teenagers: how to handle it. Raising Children Network. https://raisingchildren.net.au/teens/behaviour/behaviour-questions-issues/risky-behaviour

Robinson, M. (2011, April 10). Racial Identity Development. Student Development Theory Overview; Student Development Theory Overview. https://studentdevelopmenttheory.wordpress.com/racial-identity-development/