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of Certified Registered Nurse anesthetist (CRNA) practice to the 2001 federal rule allowing states to opt-out of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requirement that CRNAs be supervised by a physician for facility reimbursement.

Include:
1. Background of CRNA practice
2. Significance of opt out rolling in 2001
3. Discuss effects onCRNA independent practice regarding: Access to anesthesia care (Especially rural areas), Costs of anesthesia care, quality of anesthesia care ( Compare to Physician anesthesia provider model), and overall anesthesia provider (CRNA/MD) shortage.
5. Areas of needed research
5. The importance of continuing the opt-out to ensure CRNA independence
6. Conclusion

DSMN 815 Discussion Assignment Instructions Discussions are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, you

DSMN 815

Discussion Assignment Instructions

Discussions are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, you are required to create an initial thread in response to the provided prompt for each forum.

Each thread must be a minimum of 600 words and demonstrate course-related knowledge, biblical principles, and Scripture. In addition to the initial thread, you are required to reply to 2 classmates’ initial thread. Each reply must be at least 300 substantive words. These Discussions are designed for students to dive deeply into a discussion regarding one or two central ideas. Each post should demonstrate critical insight and evaluation.

If only the minimum word count is met, ensure every word is meaningful and the sentences flow and build the argument. Avoid generic or meaningless statements in the Discussions. Statements such as “I agree with you,” or “I really like what you wrote,” do not provide any substantive information. Be specific and leverage these opportunities to interact with one another and express your understanding of the discussion at hand.

The assigned reading in the course textbooks will be the central topic of conversation for each Discussion in this class. Specific prompts are provided for each Discussion related to a specific book. These Discussions are premised on the understanding that the book has been read; therefore, 50 points of the Discussion grade will be scaled to reflect that percentage. If no percentage is given, the student’s grade will be reduced by all 50 points.

Your Discussions are due by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Thursday of the specified Module: Week, and your replies are due by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Sunday of the same Module: Week.

Reading selection: “Learning to Read” excerpt from The Autobiography of Malcolm X

of Certified Registered Nurse anesthetist (CRNA) practice to the 2001 federal rule allowing states to opt-out of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requirement that CRNAs be supervised by a physician for facility reimbursement. Nursing Assignment Help Reading selection: “Learning to Read” excerpt from The Autobiography of Malcolm X

MALCOLM X

Born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, Malcolm X was one of the most articulate and powerful leaders of black America during the 1960s. A street hustler convicted of robbery in 1946, he spent seven years in prison, where he educated himself and became a disciple of Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam. In the days of the civil rights movement, Malcolm X emerged as the leading spokesman for black separatism, a philosophy that urged black Americans to cut political, social, and economic ties with the white community. After a pilgrimage to Mecca, the capital of the Muslim world, in 1964, he became an orthodox Muslim, adopted the Muslim name El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, and distanced himself from the teachings of the black Muslims. He was assassinated in 1965. In the following excerpt from his autobiography (1965), coauthored with Alex Haley and published the year of his death, Malcolm X describes his self-education.

It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education.

I became increasingly frustrated at not being able to express what I wanted to convey in letters that I wrote, especially those to Mr. Elijah Muhammad. In the street, I had been the most articulate hustler out there. I had commanded attention when I said something. But now, trying to write simple English, I not only wasn’t articulate, I wasn’t even functional. How would I sound writing in slang, the way 1 would say it, something such as, “Look, daddy, let me pull your coat about a cat, Elijah Muhammad—”

Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade. This impression is due entirely to my prison studies.

It had really begun back in the Charlestown Prison, when Bimbi first made me feel envy of his stock of knowledge. Bimbi had always taken charge of any conversations he was in, and I had tried to emulate him. But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese. When I just skipped those words, of course, I really ended up with little idea of what the book said. So I had come to the Norfolk Prison Colony still going through only book-reading motions. Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did.

I saw that the best thing I could do was get hold of a dictionary—to study, to learn some words. I was lucky enough to reason also that I should try to improve my penmanship. It was sad. I couldn’t even write in a straight line. It was both ideas together that moved me to request a dictionary along with some tablets and pencils from the Norfolk Prison Colony school.

I spent two days just riffling uncertainly through the dictionary’s pages. I’d never realized so many words existed! I didn’t know which words I needed to learn. Finally, just to start some kind of action, I began copying.

In my slow, painstaking, ragged handwriting, I copied into my tablet everything printed on that first page, down to the punctuation marks.

I believe it took me a day. Then, aloud, I read back, to myself, everything I’d written on the tablet. Over and over, aloud, to myself, I read my own handwriting.

I woke up the next morning, thinking about those words—immensely proud to realize that not only had I written so much at one time, but I’d written words that I never knew were in the world. Moreover, with a little effort, I also could remember what many of these words meant. I reviewed the words whose meanings I didn’t remember. Funny thing, from the dictionary first page right now, that “aardvark” springs to my mind. The dictionary had a picture of it, a long-tailed, long-eared, burrowing African mammal, which lives off termites caught by sticking out its tongue as an anteater does for ants.

I was so fascinated that I went on—I copied the dictionary’s next page. And the same experience came when I studied that. With every succeeding page, I also learned of people and places and events from history. Actually the dictionary is like a miniature encyclopedia. Finally the dictionary’s A section had filled a whole tablet—and I went on into the B’s. That was the way I started copying what eventually became the entire dictionary. It went a lot faster after so much practice helped me to pick up handwriting speed. Between what I wrote in my tablet, and writing letters, during the rest of my time in prison I would guess I wrote a million words.

I suppose it was inevitable that as my word-base broadened, I could for the first time pick up a book and read and now begin to understand what the book was saying. Anyone who has read a great deal can imagine the new world that opened. Let me tell you something: from then until I left that prison, in every free moment I had, if I was not reading in the library, I was reading on my bunk. You couldn’t have gotten me out of books with a wedge. Between Mr. Muhammad’s teachings, my correspondence, my visitors—usually Ella and Reginald—and my reading of books, months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned. In fact, up to then, I never had been so truly free in my life.

The Norfolk Prison Colony’s library was in the school building. A variety of classes was taught there by instructors who came from such places as Harvard and Boston universities. The weekly debates between inmate teams were also held in the school building. You would be astonished to know how worked up convict debaters and audiences would get over subjects like “Should Babies Be Fed Milk?”

Available on the prison library’s shelves were books on just about every general subject. Much of the big private collection that Parkhurst had willed to the prison was still in crates and boxes in the back of the library—thousands of old books. Some of them looked ancient: covers faded; old-time parchment-looking binding. Parkhurst, I’ve mentioned, seemed to have been principally interested in history and religion. He had the money and the special interest to have a lot of books that you wouldn’t have in general circulation. Any college library would have been lucky to get that collection.

As you can imagine, especially in a prison where there was heavy emphasis on rehabilitation, an inmate was smiled upon if he demonstrated an unusually intense interest in books. There was a sizable number of well-read inmates, especially the popular debaters, Some were said by many to be practically walking encyclopedias.

They were almost celebrities. No university would ask any student to devour literature as I did when this new world opened to me, of being able to read and understand.

I read more in my room than in the library itself. An inmate who was known to read a lot could check out more than the permitted maximum number of books. I preferred reading in the total isolation of my own room.

When I had progressed to really serious reading, every night at about ten P.M. I would be outraged with the “lights out.” It always seemed to catch me right in the middle of something engrossing.

Fortunately, right outside my door was a corridor light that cast a glow into my room. The glow was enough to read by, once my eyes adjusted to it. So when “lights out” came, I would sit on the floor where I could continue reading in that glow.

At one-hour intervals the night guards paced past every room. Each time I heard the approaching footsteps, I jumped into bed and feigned sleep. And as soon as the guard passed, I got back out of bed onto the floor area of that light-glow, where I would read for another fifty-eight minutes—until the guard approached again. That went on until three or four every morning. Three or four hours of sleep a night was enough for me. Often in the years in the streets I had slept less than that.

The teachings of Mr. Muhammad stressed how history had been “whitened”—when white men had written history books, the black man simply had been left out…I never will forget how shocked I was when I began reading about slavery’s total horror. It made such an impact upon me that it later became one of my favorite subjects when I became a minister of Mr. Muhammad’s. The world’s most monstrous crime, the sin and the blood on the white man’s hands, are almost impossible to believe…I read descriptions of atrocities, saw those illustrations of black slave women tied up and flogged with whips; of black mothers watching their babies being dragged off, never to be seen by their mothers again; of dogs after slaves, and of the fugitive slave catchers, evil white men with whips and clubs and chains and guns…

Book after book showed me how the white man had brought upon the world’s black, brown, red, and yellow peoples every variety of the sufferings of exploitation. I saw how since the sixteenth century, the so-called “Christian trader” white man began to ply the seas in his lust for Asian and African empires, and plunder, and power. I read, I saw, how the white man never has gone among the non-white peoples bearing the Cross in the true manner and spirit of Christ’s teachings—meek, humble, and Christlike…

I have often reflected upon the new vistas that reading opened to me. I knew right there in prison that reading had changed forever the course of my life. As I see it today, the ability to read awoke inside me some long dormant craving to be mentally alive. I certainly wasn’t seeking any degree, the way a college confers a status symbol upon its students. My homemade education gave me, with every additional book that I read, a little bit more sensitivity to the deafness, dumbness, and blindness that was afflicting the black race in America. Not long ago, an English writer telephoned me from London, asking questions. One was, “What’s your alma mater?” I told him, “Books.” You will never catch me with a free fifteen minutes in which I’m not studying something I feel might be able to help the black man.

Discussion Forum Rubric Name of Student Evaluated: ________ Criteria 0 1 –

Discussion Forum Rubric

Name of Student Evaluated:     ________

Criteria

0

1 – 2

3 – 4

5

Total Points

Initial Post

Post contains substantial information of topic and adds to the understanding of the topic, with citations from evidence based resources.

Requirements: minimum of two evidenced based practice (EBP) resources per post (Resource needs to be published within the past 5 years, unless it is a landmark source). Attach any articles used. Minimum of 500 to maximum of 800 words in post. Thoughts are complete and supported by 2 EBP resources as researched.

Does not meet criteria.

Meets some criteria. Word count outside of parameters. Does not facilitate discussion by adding depth, lacking citations. No evidence-based resources.

Meets most criteria.

Word count outside of parameters. Does not facilitate discussion by adding depth, missing citations. Lacking at least one evidence-based resource.

Meets all criteria.

Word count within parameters. Facilitates discussion by adding depth, with appropriate citations. At least two appropriate evidence-based resources.

/5

Response to others (three responses to peers)

Respond to three peers with a post that expands the discussion and adds depth to previous information. Include in each response, reflection upon at least 2 of the following:

1). How you would use the information included in the post within your current role in industry?

2). How your understanding has changed as a result of the information shared in the post.

3). Provide nursing practice examples directly related to the content of the initial post.

4). Identify differences and/or similarities with evidence from your own professional nursing experiences or initial post.

Requirements: substantive responses to a minimum of three peers. Each response post includes a minimum of 250 but no more than 500 words (reflection questions included above cannot be included in final word count). Your response should not be superficial, and will be graded based upon its substance.

Does not meet criteria.

Meets some criteria

Fewer than 2 responses posted. Word count outside of parameters. Does not expand discussion by adding depth.

Meets most criteria

At least 2 responses posted. Incorporated at least 1 of the reflection items. Word count outside of parameters. Does not expand discussion by adding depth.

Meets all criteria

At least 3 responses posted within required word count, adding depth to previous information. Thoughtfully incorporated at least 2 of the reflection items. Each response post included a minimum of 250 but no more than 500 words (reflection questions included above cannot be included in final word count). Response was substantive.

/5

Writing criteria for all posts:

APA formatting for all references and citations. Reference page included as an attachment for initial post. (Resources need to be published within the past 5 years, unless a landmark source). Must attach all articles used, including those obtained from the MSU library. Required sources may be web site references, and must be from notable sites such as .gov or .org not .com or Wikipedia. Logical progression of ideas and professional writing style, no spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not meet criteria.

Meets some criteria. Moderate APA errors or grammatical errors. References are not included as an attachment to initial post and are not published within 5 years. Web resources are not acceptable.

Meets most criteria.

Minimal APA errors or grammatical errors. References are not included as an attachment to initial post, or not published within 5 years, or some web resources are not acceptable.

Meets all criteria.

No more than 2 APA errors or grammatical errors. References are included as an attachment to initial post and published within 5 years. All web resources are acceptable.

/5

Total Points

_____/15

Faculty: ___ ______________________ Dated: _Jan 2022____

FINC 495 First, read the case Week 2 Looking into a Botched

FINC 495

First, read the case Week 2 Looking into a Botched IPO (Investment Analysis and Corporate Governance):  Can WeWork Survive its Botched IPO?

Pdf. file with this case is posted in Content – Cases for Graded Discussions

Second, answer the following questions. In your initial response to the topic you have to answer all questions:

Can you identify some early red flags in WeWork’s corporate governance structure and leadership? What can startups learn from WeWork’s missteps?

How closely should tech/startup investors examine a company’s long-term revenue plan before investing? Do you see WeWork’s botched IPO as a failure by the company, a failure by investors who had overinflated their initial valuation, or both? What do you think contributed to the inflated valuation in the first place?

Do you think SoftBank’s takeover will be effective? Beyond layoffs, what are some strategies WeWork can implement to recover its losses even as it plans for growth?

Reflection – the students also should include a paragraph in the initial response in their own words, using finance terminology, reflecting on specifically what they learned from the assignment and how they think they could apply what they learned in the workplace or in everyday life.

ECON 430 Discussion Questions: 1. Management has latitude under GAAP in selecting

ECON 430

Discussion Questions:

1. Management has latitude under GAAP in selecting accounting methods. What are some of the areas in which different methods can affect the

reporting of financial results?

2. What are some of the potential warning signs that you see in the Form 10K financial statements for the company that you selected for the Company Analysis Project?

3. Why is it important for an analyst to review the “Auditor’s Opinion” in a company’s financial statements?  What does the Auditor’s Opinion in the Form 10K report for the company that you selected for the Company Analysis Project reveal to shareholders and analysts?  Should the Auditor’s Opinion contain more or less information?

4. Why is it important for an analyst to carefully examine the non-recurring transactions including write-downs, accounting changes, and extraordinary items?  What write-downs, accounting changes, and extraordinary items are revealed in the Form 10K report for the company that you selected for the Company Analysis Project?

5. Most Important Things Learned – What are the most important things you learned from the study of this week’s readings, discussions, and assignments?