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All Hospitals Care For Many Types Of Injuries And Emergency Conditions Ranging Ap History Essay Help

All hospitals care for many types of injuries and emergency conditions ranging from minor to severe, but not all hospitals are designated as a Trauma Center. When a patient needs emergency assistance, they will be taken to the hospital’s Emergency Room (ER). Here, emergency physicians will assess whether these patients in critical condition should be treated by specialists in Emergency Medicine or by specialists in the Trauma Center. Emergency Medicine typically addresses broader, non-life-threatening injuries such as broken bones, minor burns or injuries that may require stitches. 

Emergency Room & Trauma Designation and Verification

Emergency Room Designation

According to Trzeciak (2003), an Emergency Room treats many common conditions ranging from minor, non-life-threatening injuries to possible heart attacks and strokes. The training for Emergency Medicine differs from Trauma because it typically encompasses a broader spectrum of emergency conditions. Physicians and surgeons in Emergency Medicine see patients with the following types of injuries or conditions: Broken bones, Chest pains, Loss of consciousness, Minor burns, Minor lacerations requiring stitches, Severe abdominal pain/ vomiting/ diarrhea, Sprains, Signs of a heart attack, and Signs of a stroke (Trzeciak, 2003).

Emergency Room Verification

Certification and Compliance for the Emergency Room or Emergency Departments is under the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor (EMTALA) (Zibulewsky, 2001).

The Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) requires hospitals with

emergency departments to provide a medical screening examination to any individual

who comes to the emergency department and requests such an examination, and prohibits hospitals with emergency departments from refusing to examine or treat individuals with an emergency medical condition. The term “hospital” includes critical access hospitals. (EMTALA, 1986).

In turn, the regulation defines “dedicated emergency department” as any department or

facility of the hospital that either: (1) is licensed by the state as an emergency department;

(2) held out to the public as providing treatment for emergency medical conditions; or (3) on one-third of the visits to the department in the preceding calendar year actually provided treatment for emergency medical conditions on an urgent basis. (Aacharya, Gastman, & Denier, 2011).

Trauma Centers

According to Peitzman (2002) Trauma centers across the United States are identified by a designation process and a verification process. The different levels (i.e., Level I, II, III, IV or V) refer to the kinds of resources available within a trauma center and the number of patients admitted yearly. Being at a Level 1 trauma center provides the highest level of surgical care for trauma patients.

Trauma Designation

Trauma Center designation is a process outlined and developed at a state or local level. The state or local municipality identifies unique criteria in which to categorize Trauma Centers. These categories may vary from state to state.

A facility can be designated an adult trauma center, a pediatric trauma center, or an adult & pediatric trauma center. If a hospital provides trauma care for both adult and pediatric patients, the Level designation may not be the same for each group. For example, a Level 1 adult trauma center may also be a Level II pediatric trauma center. Pediatric trauma surgery is its own specialty and adult trauma surgeons are not generally specialized in providing surgical trauma care to children, and vice versa.

Trauma Verification

Trauma Center Verification is an evaluation process done by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) to evaluate and improve trauma care. The ACS does not designate trauma centers but verifies the presence of the resources listed in Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient. This is a voluntary process by the Trauma Center and lasts for a 3-year period. Part of the verification process includes requiring all members of the trauma team to be knowledgeable about current practices in neurotrauma care and the best evidence for the care of the neurotrauma patient, including head, spine/spinal cord, and peripheral nerve injury. Use of Brain Trauma Foundation’s Guidelines for topics such as adult and pediatric head injury, prehospital management, surgical management, penetrating injury, and acute spine and spinal cord injury is strongly recommended for all trauma centers.

Trauma Center Levels
         As mentioned above, Trauma categories vary from state to state. Outlined below are common criteria for Trauma Centers verified by the ACS and also designated by states and municipalities. Facilities are designated/verified as Adult and/or Pediatric Trauma Centers. It is not uncommon for facilities to have different designations for each group (ie. a Trauma Center may be a Level I Adult facility and also a Level II Pediatric Facility). (ACS, n.d.)

 

Level I

Level I Trauma Center is a comprehensive regional resource that is a tertiary care facility central to the trauma system. A Level I Trauma Center is capable of providing total care for every aspect of injury – from prevention through rehabilitation.

According to the ACS (n.d.) requirements of Level I Trauma Centers Include:

24-hour in-house coverage by general surgeons, and prompt availability of care in specialties such as orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology, internal medicine, plastic surgery, oral and maxillofacial, pediatric and critical care.

Referral resource for communities in nearby regions.

Provides leadership in prevention, public education to surrounding communities.

Provides continuing education of the trauma team members.

Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.

Operates an organized teaching and research effort to help direct new innovations in trauma care.

Program for substance abuse screening and patient intervention.

Meets minimum requirement for annual volume of severely injured patients.

 

Level II

A Level II Trauma Center is able to initiate definitive care for all injured patients.

According to the ACS (n.d.) requirements (Standards by the ACS) of Level II Trauma Centers Include:

24-hour immediate coverage by general surgeons, as well as coverage by the specialties of orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology and critical care.

Tertiary care needs such as cardiac surgery, hemodialysis and microvascular surgery may be referred to a Level I Trauma Center.

Provides trauma prevention and continuing education programs for staff.

Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.

 

Level III

A Level III Trauma Center has demonstrated an ability to provide prompt assessment, resuscitation, surgery, intensive care and stabilization of injured patients and emergency operations.

According to the ACS (n.d.) requirements (Standards by the ACS) of Level III Trauma Centers Include:

24-hour immediate coverage by emergency medicine physicians and the prompt availability of general surgeons and anesthesiologists.

Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program

Has developed transfer agreements for patients requiring more comprehensive care at a Level I or Level II Trauma Center.

Provides back-up care for rural and community hospitals.

Offers continued education of the nursing and allied health personnel or the trauma team.

Involved with prevention efforts and must have an active outreach program for its referring communities.

 

Trauma Centers in Texas

The following information was obtained for the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS, n.d.).

20 facilities are currently designated as Level I Comprehensive Trauma Facilities.

26 facilities are currently designated as Level II Major Trauma Facilities.

62 facilities are currently designated as Level III Advanced Trauma Facilities.

194 Facilities are currently designated as Level IV Basic Trauma Facilities.

 

Designations may include, but not limited to Adult, Maternal, Neonatal, Stroke, Trauma, and Data Sources

 

 

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The Process Used By Companies To Assign Costs In An ABC System Essay Help Fairfax

case studyStudents are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment 2

Deadline: 31/10/2020 @ 23:59

Course Name: Cost accountingStudent’s Name:Course Code: ACCT 301Student’s ID Number:Semester: 1CRN:Academic Year: 1441/1442 H

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name:Students’ Grade:  Marks Obtained/Out ofLevel of Marks: High/Middle/Low

Instructions – PLEASE

READ THEM CAREFULLY

The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.Late submission will NOT be accepted.Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions.All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.

Q1 Give example of company using ABC costing and explain the process used in this company to assign costs in an ABC system? (Week 7: Chapter 7, ABC costing)

Answer:

      Q 2 Give examples of questions managers could ask to help them identify relevant qualitative factors that will be used before making decision? (Week 9: Chapter 4,   Relevant information for decision making)

Answer:

      Q 3 Kadhim Co. manufactures product B which is a part of its main product. Kadhim Co makes 50,000 units of product B per year. The production costs are detailed below. An outside supplier has offered to supply 50,000 units of product B per year at $ 2.45 each. Fixed production cost of $ 40,000 associated with the product B are unavoidable. Should Kadhim Co make or buy the product B?

The production cost per unit for manufacturing a unit of product B are:

Direct Materials0.85Direct Labor0.65Variable Manufacturing Overhead0.40

   (Week 9: Chapter 4,  Relevant information for decision making)

Answer:

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Research assignment on metropolitan highway mba essay help

Case 41

Metropolitan Highway

Metronight is the fastest growing city in the country’s “Moon Belt,” with a growth rate of nearly 11% per year for the last decade. This growth has offered unprecedented economic opportunities both to long-time residents and to newcomers. It has also brought pollution problems, severe traffic congestion, and increased community tensions.

These tensions have come from a more rapid pace of life and from an uneven distribution of the benefits and costs of growth over the communities that make up Metronight. In particular, suburbs, strip development, industrial parks, and shopping malls have grown rapidly. On the other hand, the older residential and industrial areas have not grown, but instead have decayed marginally. During the last year there has been an alarming increase in the unemployment rate within the central city. Even worse, one of the largest industrial plants (9000 employees) has announced that it will close, rather than renovate, its facility within the year unless the city significantly improves the transportation network.

Because of the rapid growth, construction of expressways has consistently lagged behind the level of traffic demand. Commuters to the older industrial core from the newer residential areas face delays averaging about 45 minutes for both the morning and evening trips—in addition to the normal travel time between work and home. More importantly, the city’s road system within its older core suffers from aging pavement and bridges. Already, larger tractortrailer rigs (those over 30 tons) must detour around a weakened bridge that crosses the river that forms the eastern boundary of the older industrial core. This detour adds about 20 minutes to the average one-way trip (they are scheduled to avoid rush hour).

179

Cases in Engineering Economy 2nd by Peterson & Eschenbach

A group of leading citizens has put together a redevelopment proposal that combines the efforts of Metronight’s government with private sector initiatives. Their proposal would affect property taxes and the transportation network, as well as requiring long-term training and employment commitments from employers. Since it was put together by private parties, Mayor Andrea Fineglass is certain that they perceive its benefits as exceeding its costs. She is worried that this comes through governmental subsidies. Thus she has asked you (you work in the municipal engineering department) to analyze the proposal from a municipal perspective. Then she will either commit to support the proposal or ask that it be modified to better suit the city.

One direct cost to the city is a proposed moratorium on property tax increases in the industrial core. This would freeze tax rates and assessments for the first five years for industries in the older core area. The booster group has pointed out that private sector improvements are expected to increase the value of the core by 50% with the proposal. They also claim that without the revitalization effort assessments will fall by $10 million per year until they reach half of the current value.

The other large direct cost is the necessity of raising taxes (either a sales tax or the mill rate for property taxes) to cover greater municipal expenditures on the transportation improvements. Calculation of these direct costs is complicated by a large indirect cost—that state and federal assistance for transportation improvements must be dedicated to this redevelopment. Transportation improvements are currently funded 50% federal, 35% state, and 15% Metronight for both normal projects and for this package.

Specifically the redevelopment calls for investment of $75 million over the first three years (currently Metronight averages about $18 million in transportation projects per year with a B/C ratio of 1.5). The mayor has stated that she believes the increased level of funding can be achieved. She expects that $3 million of urgent (B/C ratio of 3.0) projects will have to be funded directly by Metronight for each year of the construction period. Political trade-offs are also expected to reduce general transportation funding to $10 million for the first year after the redevelopment construction. This will increase back to the current $18 million over the following five years.

During construction of the transportation improvements, additional short-term disruptions will occur. The disruptions are likely to increase delays for commuters and business traffic by 25% the first year, by 40% the second year, and by 30% the third year. The final impact should be to halve the commuter delays and to eliminate any detours for heavy trucks.

The transportation improvements will require the acquisition of about $40 million in residential and small-business property. The process of negotiation (and condemnation where 180

Case 41            Metropolitan Highway

required) is likely to add $3 million in legal and administrative costs. About 75% of the property payments seem likely to lead to new construction or renovation in nearby areas. This property will be subject to the same 3% tax rate as the rest of Metronight. (This rate is high because of the decaying core and rapid additions of new facilities). The remaining 25% of the property payments will be used to “retire to Florida” or other options that remove money from the Metronight area.

The industrial core currently generates on a daily basis 40,000 one-way person-trips for its workforce and another 1500 truck trips (although only 10% are above the 30-ton limit for the detour). The annual average wage for these workers is $17,500, although the truck drivers average $25,000.

It appears that this revitalization program would not have augmented the city’s growth rate if it had been initiated sooner. Rather, there would have been a different geographical pattern of growth for Metronight. If a large number of the industrial facilities in this older core are relocated, many of them will relocate to other communities rather than to the growing areas of Metronight.

This older industrial core has a total of about 19,000 employees and about $220 million in assessed valuation. Also the mayor, in response to your plea for guidance, has selected a 7% discount rate, a 30-year life, and a value for leisure time of a third of the wage rate. She left you with the problem of estimating any indirect or consequential costs.

Options

Include the following variations for a property tax moratorium:  (a) as proposed on improvements, but inflation adjustments on current base are allowed; (b) sooner or more rapid adjustments; or (c) on reassessments, but not on rates.

Include specific impacts on the city’s employment. In the short term, 20% of the additional construction expenditures are expected to swell the income of residents. In the long run, the different pattern of jobs is expected to slow the growth of the city’s population. Rather than new residents moving to the suburbs from other localities, more of the jobs will be filled by residents of the city’s core (where there is an unemployment rate that is five times the rate for the rest of Metronight).

            181

HW-9 Case Study-2 CON-E 330

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Please Use this page as Cover page; attach your detail of your work on one- side of paper, typing is optional.

Late work will not be accepted Total Points 10

Due Date: Post on CANVAS before Friday 10/30/2020 before 11:30 pm                    

Exercises must be presented in a neat, well organized and professional manner as follows:

Correct order Show your name at the top of the page.Show your name at the top of the page.The problem statement should include the essence of what is given and what is to be determine, not the question as provided to you. Include figures as appropriateProblem solution presented in a logical, orderly fashion, and enough but brief text (such as headers) to clearly explain the procedure used. All calculations shown separately, including units and conversions; and four decimal places. BOX / or High light your Final Answer and Recommendations’.

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Research writing on scenes. essay help site:edu
Pick one scene that impressed you most from the film assigned for the week. Explain how and why that particular scene is impressive to you. Refer to the assigned reading of the week and think about how your argument is related to it. Include the image(s)

Experimental Research

According to the textbook: Abdel-Khalik and Ajinkya (1979) provide a precise definition of the nature of an experiment in that the researcher manipulates one or more variables with subjects who are assigned randomly to various groups. These groups receive different combinations of the variables (termed treatments); in some cases a control group may exist which receives no such treatments. The major advantage of experiments lies in the researchers’ ability to ensure high internal validity, defined in terms of how well they can eliminate rival explanations for their results. Experiments are, thus, particularly suited to research questions that investigate causal relations between variables. (Smith, 2015)

Experimental Research

The problem statement ● Variables of interest o Y = the dependent variable or observation o Xi = the independent variable ▪ Can be manipulated in value or measured

Experimental Research

Theory and context

The embedding of judgement within the context of a particular taskThe role of incentives to participantsThe use of professionals as research participantsThe use of deception to create appropriate research settings

Experimental Research

Experimental design Post-test only control group design o Subjects are assigned randomly to treatments.Pre-test/post-test control group design o Subjects are measured to see how they react to successive treatments.Factorial design: between subjects o Involves the simultaneous variation of two or more transitions.Factorial design: within subjects o Before-and-after factorial design

Experimental Research

Variables that can threaten internal validity.Alternative approaches include: o Control groups o Randomization o Holding constant o Matching o Counterbalancing o Ignoring variables

Experimental Research

The validity trade-off ●   Three validity concerns: o Construct validity threats ▪ Specify the variables that are both observable and related to the construct. ▪     Determine the extent to which these observable variables are reliable measures of one or more constructs. o Internal validity o External validity

Experimental Research

oInternal validity threats ▪       Maturation ▪History ▪Testing ▪Subject mortality ▪Experimental mortality ▪Instrumentation ▪Selection ▪Statistical regression ▪Imitation of treatments ▪Resentful demoralization

Experimental Research

oExternal validity threats ▪ Population validity ▪ Ecological validity ▪ Temporal validity ▪ Treatment/selection interaction ▪ Treatment/setting interaction ▪ Treatment/treatment interaction

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The fundamental role of poetry cheap essay help: cheap essay help
Poetry writing homeworkOne fundamental role of poetry, and perhaps literature in general, is to respond to the question “how should humans live?” Critique of society has been a constant in poetry since the beginning.William Blake (1757–1827) was an English poet of the Romantic period. Romanticism stressed individualism above society, emotion above the controlled and rational, the beauty of nature and oneness of the individual with nature, and spontaneity. Consequently, social criticism is a major theme in Blake’s work.Additionally, although they have often been analyzed separately, just as people combine digital image files and videos today, one of Blake’s innovations was the combination of engraved and painted illustrations with the poetic text.Please read the poems themselves and pay close attention to the visual images in the attached examples from Songs of Innocence and Experience.Note the difference between image and imagery.The definitions according to the Oxford Dictionary of English, 2017, are as follows:image: “a representation of the external form of a person or thing in art,” an example being “her work juxtaposed images from serious and popular art.” (picture)Imagery: “visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work,” an example being “Tennyson uses imagery to create a lyrical emotion.”The intent of the assignment is for people to study the visual images Blake engraved that are integral to the poetry and to use those in conjunction with the text analysis to explain how the images contribute to the interpretation. A significant amount of analysis provided by the Tate accompanies each text, but the Tate does not explain how the image and the text work together.Be sure to use appropriate slashes and formatting in the quotation of poetry and to enclose the titles of poems in quotation marks.

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i need help with homeworkNow that we have gone over the requirements attached to the essay for Project 3, let’s start the reading. This project is based off of your response to the first chapter of Jeffrey Jerome Cohen’s book. The first chapter is entitled “Monster Culture.” Spoiler alert: Even though his theses and the content is fascinating, Cohen doesn’t really care if you understand him–his language is academic and can be excessively dense at times. I only want to share this before we start because I want to assure you that it might take some time to read and understand the text. Don’t worry, I’ve provided you with my notes.Cohen Monster Culture.pdfMinimize File PreviewIf you are having trouble with the material in the article, I have provided below a Crib Sheet for understanding the seven theses. Feel free to use my notes to your advantage; this is a hard and difficult text to get into, and Cohen uses very dense language.Crib Sheet for Monster Culture.docxMinimize File PreviewWhen you have finished reading “Monster Culture,” please fill out the following PACES Worksheet. When the worksheet references strategies, it is asking you to write down how Cohen is connecting or not with his audience. Please reference ethos, pathos, logos, and what we learned in Project 2 about connecting with an audience (TED-Connecting through Stories .pdf).I have also put together a handout on tone if you are having trouble describing Cohen’s writing: 155 Words to Describe an Author.pdf)Breaking Down Cohen.docxBreaking Down Cohen Worksheet.pdf

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Individual Research PaperThe research paper will be 6-8 double-spaced pages in text length, not including cover page, Table of Contents, References, or Appendices Paper must be written according to APA style and be carefully referenced.The purpose of this paper is to take a narrow leadership topic and do an in-depth review of the current literature on this topic. This is a library research paper and you must use at least 10 different scholarly sources, in addition to the textbooks. Be sure to use published journal articles as your sources, not less-reliable Internet web sites. Reference your paper very carefully and tightly.Appearance, punctuation, grammar, neatness, and spelling count. This must be a professional looking paper to receive full credit. Paper should have an introduction, body, conclusion, and reference section. Paper should also have a Table of Contents and appropriate headings and sub-headings in the body of the paper. Be sure to use the required title page. Write transition sentences between sections so that the reader knows where you are going and why. Note that this is a research paper. Avoid all first person pronouns and personal opinion.You may choose from the list of topics below or suggest one of your own to the instructor. If you choose a different other than the topics presented below, be sure to e-mail your topic to the instructor and get approval before you start working. This assignment is worth 35% (35 points) of your grade.*** Suggested Topics for Research Papers (Be sure to relate topic specifically to Leadership Research)

Student Name

ENGL 2323

Dr. Brinda Roy

Date

Essay 2 Outline

Title of Essay

IntroductionElizabeth Barrett Browning Sonnets from the PortugueseBrief background on BrowningDescription of her sonnets and context for when and where and why they were writtenThesisBrowning uses various literary devices in order to convey a complex voice acting as both lover and beloved interchangeably, thus setting her work apart from that of her predominantly male contemporaries and predecessors (name some of these male contemporaries).Body paragraph 1: ToneBarrett uses tone to establish an active presence for the speaker in her sonnets.From sonnet 21: “Say over again, and yet once over again,/ That thou dost love me” (Browning, 1-2)A commanding presence is establishedShe is the one asking her lover to validate their feelingsFrom sonnet 32: “Quick loving hearts, I Thought, may quickly loathe;/ And looking on myself, I seemed not one/ For such a man’s love!” (Browning, 5-7).Browning’s tone is doubtful and cynicalShe does not believe in the sincerity of her lover’s doting, thus creating a poetic self-consciousness that grapples with the theme of the realities of love, and is by turns doubtful, fearful, and anxiousWhat if the subject does not fully believe the speaker?From sonnet 43: “I love thee to the level of every day’s/ Most quiet heed, by sun and candlelight” (Browning, 5-6).Browning exhibits a tone of unconditional devotionThe love she bears the subject, while grand and exciting, retains a level of realism extending through the monotony of everyday lifeThe tone, though changing from sonnet to sonnet, is consistently grounded in reality, in which love is questioned, reciprocated, and dynamic

III. Body Paragraph 2: Imagery

Browning uses imagery to evoke a myriad of feelings, some positive, others negative, to display the nuance and contradictions found in love.From sonnet 22: “The angels would press on us and aspire/ To drop some golden orb of perfect song/ Into our deep, dear silence” (Browning, 7-9).These lines offer a rejection of the ethereal depiction of love and romanceRather than being concerned with achieving perfection in love, she wants to feel the raw and imperfect state that is special to the two of themFrom Sonnet 32: “More like an out-of-tune/ Worn viol, a good singer would be wroth/ To spoil his song, and which, snatched in haste,/ Is laid down at the first ill-sounding note” (Browning, 8-10).A projection of her own self-doubts onto her loverPossibly the result of seeing other muses objectified to an unattainable standard, knowing that a real person could not exist in such perfectionFrom sonnet 21: “Remember, never to the hill or plain,/ Valley and wood, without her cuckoo strain/ Comes the fresh spring in all her green completed” (Browning, 4-6).A joyous affirmationAs the cuckoo song marks the coming of spring, the lovers proclamations give way to new life in the speakerSome images maintain the claim that love is grand and wonderous, but others show the reality of love just as clearlyThe juxtapositions inadvertently show the one-sidedness of traditional sonnets (give examples of traditional sonnets and the conventional treatment of love in them)Body paragraph 3: Rhythm

Rhythm maintains a distinct sonnet-like pattern, whilst the rise and fall within each sonnet reflects the ups and downs of the two lovers relationship

From sonnet 43: “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways./ I love thee to the depth and breadth and height/ My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight” (Browning, 1-3)The repetitive and choppy rhythm describes the speaker literally beginning to list off the ways she loves the subjectRather than just speaking to the wonders of her lover, she describes what their existence evokes in her, proclaiming utter devotionFrom sonnet 21: “Say thou dost love me, love me, love me—toll/ The silver iterance” (Browning 12-13).The repetition is a request of her lover to reciprocate her feelingsGives the subject a voice and need for their affirmationsFrom sonnet 22: “When our two souls stand up erect and strong,/ Face to face, silent, drawing nigh and nigher” (Browning, 1-2)The structure creates a feeling of equality between the two loversRather than placing one or the other on a pedestal, they are both equal beings enraptured by their love for one another

The many different cadences of each sonnet establish a distinct voice in each one.

Conclusion

Reflection on how Browning’s sonnets are distinguishable by her style, voice, and themes.

Student Name

ENGL 2323

Dr. Brinda Roy

Date

Essay 2 Outline

Title of Essay

IntroductionElizabeth Barrett Browning Sonnets from the PortugueseBrief background on BrowningDescription of her sonnets and context for when and where and why they were writtenThesisBrowning uses various literary devices in order to convey a complex voice acting as both lover and beloved interchangeably, thus setting her work apart from that of her predominantly male contemporaries and predecessors (name some of these male contemporaries).Body paragraph 1: ToneBarrett uses tone to establish an active presence for the speaker in her sonnets.From sonnet 21: “Say over again, and yet once over again,/ That thou dost love me” (Browning, 1-2)A commanding presence is establishedShe is the one asking her lover to validate their feelingsFrom sonnet 32: “Quick loving hearts, I Thought, may quickly loathe;/ And looking on myself, I seemed not one/ For such a man’s love!” (Browning, 5-7).Browning’s tone is doubtful and cynicalShe does not believe in the sincerity of her lover’s doting, thus creating a poetic self-consciousness that grapples with the theme of the realities of love, and is by turns doubtful, fearful, and anxiousWhat if the subject does not fully believe the speaker?From sonnet 43: “I love thee to the level of every day’s/ Most quiet heed, by sun and candlelight” (Browning, 5-6).Browning exhibits a tone of unconditional devotionThe love she bears the subject, while grand and exciting, retains a level of realism extending through the monotony of everyday lifeThe tone, though changing from sonnet to sonnet, is consistently grounded in reality, in which love is questioned, reciprocated, and dynamic

III. Body Paragraph 2: Imagery

Browning uses imagery to evoke a myriad of feelings, some positive, others negative, to display the nuance and contradictions found in love.From sonnet 22: “The angels would press on us and aspire/ To drop some golden orb of perfect song/ Into our deep, dear silence” (Browning, 7-9).These lines offer a rejection of the ethereal depiction of love and romanceRather than being concerned with achieving perfection in love, she wants to feel the raw and imperfect state that is special to the two of themFrom Sonnet 32: “More like an out-of-tune/ Worn viol, a good singer would be wroth/ To spoil his song, and which, snatched in haste,/ Is laid down at the first ill-sounding note” (Browning, 8-10).A projection of her own self-doubts onto her loverPossibly the result of seeing other muses objectified to an unattainable standard, knowing that a real person could not exist in such perfectionFrom sonnet 21: “Remember, never to the hill or plain,/ Valley and wood, without her cuckoo strain/ Comes the fresh spring in all her green completed” (Browning, 4-6).A joyous affirmationAs the cuckoo song marks the coming of spring, the lovers proclamations give way to new life in the speakerSome images maintain the claim that love is grand and wonderous, but others show the reality of love just as clearlyThe juxtapositions inadvertently show the one-sidedness of traditional sonnets (give examples of traditional sonnets and the conventional treatment of love in them)Body paragraph 3: Rhythm

Rhythm maintains a distinct sonnet-like pattern, whilst the rise and fall within each sonnet reflects the ups and downs of the two lovers relationship

From sonnet 43: “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways./ I love thee to the depth and breadth and height/ My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight” (Browning, 1-3)The repetitive and choppy rhythm describes the speaker literally beginning to list off the ways she loves the subjectRather than just speaking to the wonders of her lover, she describes what their existence evokes in her, proclaiming utter devotionFrom sonnet 21: “Say thou dost love me, love me, love me—toll/ The silver iterance” (Browning 12-13).The repetition is a request of her lover to reciprocate her feelingsGives the subject a voice and need for their affirmationsFrom sonnet 22: “When our two souls stand up erect and strong,/ Face to face, silent, drawing nigh and nigher” (Browning, 1-2)The structure creates a feeling of equality between the two loversRather than placing one or the other on a pedestal, they are both equal beings enraptured by their love for one another

The many different cadences of each sonnet establish a distinct voice in each one.

Conclusion

Reflection on how Browning’s sonnets are distinguishable by her style, voice, and themes.

Student Name

Dr. Brinda Roy

ENGL 2323

19 March 2019[MOU1] 

The Death of God in “Holy Thursday”: An Analysis of The States of the Human Soul in William Blake’s “Holy Thursday” Poems[MOU2] 

Songs of Innocence and Experience [MOU3] by William Blake is a collection of complementary poems intended to highlight differences in human experiences. The set of “Holy Thursday” [MOU4] poems focus on the relationship of orphan children and the church. In “Holy Thursday” from Innocence the procession of young children on Holy Thursday is perceived as beneficial and righteous for the children and the church. In the opposing poem “Holy Thursday” from the Experience collection, a more dismal portrayal of the same procession is present. The conflicting experience allows the speaker to see the misery and poverty of the children. Blake’s “Holy Thursday” poems examine the same scene from two differing perspectives, thus emphasizing the existence of contradictory views with regard to innocence and experience.[MOU5] 

Blake uses a plethora of devices [MOU6] to accentuate the individual experience of each speaker in the set of poems. The prevalent use of imagery [MOU7] allows each poem to paint different pictures of the same scene. In the Innocence “Holy Thursday,” [MOU8] Blake’s descriptive language evokes pure and colorful images. The speaker describes the children with, “Innocent faces clean” (Blake 1). [MOU9] The clean faces of the children indicate that they are well-kempt, and taken care of by their wardens. The speaker looks upon the children with pride because they appear presentable for the other onlookers. The children are compared to flowers: “What a multitude they seemed these flowers of London town” (Blake 5). The comparison conjures up a lovely image, as if the children are flowers in a garden. They are clean and bright, but most importantly the image implies they are well-tended to by their gardener who is, in this case, the church taking care of them. Blake continues to use the likeness of nature: “Till into the high dome of Pauls they like Thames waters flow” (Blake 4). The procession is similarly mighty as the Thames river, flowing with grandiose and grace comparable to the wonders of nature. The speaker thinks highly of the parade of children on Holy Thursday, and sings the praises of the institution that leads them.

In Experience “Holy Thursday” there is a stark contrast in tone. [MOU10] The imagery is heavier, as the speaker asks, “Is that trembling cry a song?” (Blake 5). The speaker sees past the visual facade put on by the procession; the underlying misery in the children’s song is impossible to ignore. The speaker goes on to describe the path the children follow: “And their ways are fill’d with thorns/ It [MOU11] is eternal winter there” (Blake 11-12). The children live in poverty, and their condition is not likely to improve. The bleak outlook the speaker has on the children’s future suggests that they have seen other generations of children walk the same path with no chance of living a better life. Blake describes the physical setting of the poem as being, “In a rich and fruitful land” (Blake 2). Ironically, the setting of the poem is not nearly as dismal as the situation the children are in. The presence of this sole piece of positive imagery serves to explain the injustice of the scene in which the town might live lavishly, or at the very least comfortably, while the children suffer. The polarizing tones in each poem further aid Blake in his quest to present the contradictory experiences. [MOU12] 

Blake uses rhyme to differentiate the two poems[MOU13] . In “Holy Thursday” from Innocence each four-line stanza consists of two couplet rhymes. The rhyme scheme is regular and smooth which adds to the notion that the procession is well-organized and rehearsed. The speaker describes the scene of, “Grey-headed beadles walked before with wands as white as snow/ Till into the high dome of Pauls they like Thames waters flow” (Blake 3-4). [MOU14] The parade is neat and tidy, similar to the rhyme scheme, and it boasts the organization of the church. The scene is intended to put on a show the entire time:[MOU15]  “Beneath them sit the aged men wise guardians of the poor/ Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door” (Blake 11-12). The speaker urges the townspeople to marvel at the good deeds of the church, referring to the figureheads as wise guardians implying that they know what is best for the poor children. [MOU16] The rhyme scheme of “Holy Thursday” Experience is far more sporadic, not following any particular pattern at all. The speaker comes across as sincerer than the former, and the poem in turn is less forcefully organized, retaining its integral truth. The rhyming lines pose a question and answer: “Is this a holy thing to see/ … [MOU17] Babes reduced to misery” (Blake 1 and 3). The second line implicitly answers the firsts, for children in misery could not possibly represent a holy sight. The poem closes with an idealistic holy scene: “And where-e’er the rain does fall/ Babe can never hunger there/ Nor poverty the mind appall” (Blake 14-16). The closing lines further explain [MOU18] how if the procession on Holy Thursday was truly a “holy thing” the children would not be hungry and living in poverty. The structure of each poem contributes to distinguishing tone just as much as the content itself.

Blake also uses point of view [MOU19] as a device to create a truly jarring tonal shift from one poem to the next. The speaker’s point of view in “Holy Thursday” from Innocence sings the praises of the procession. It is possible that the speaker is either an institutional head or member of the church. The poem comes across as a sales pitch, and the speaker makes a considerable effort to paint the scene in a positive, marketable light. The point of view is made apparent when the speaker describes, “The children walking two and two in red and blue and green” (Blake 2). The speaker observes the scene on a generally physical plane, and their observations are mostly sensory rather than looking deeper. The children are described, “Seated in companies they sit with radiance all their own” (Blake 6). There is a keen sense that the speaker is looking down upon the scene with smug pride. The radiance of the children is supposedly all their own, but the underlying attitude of the poem suggests that the church has manufactured this radiance. [MOU20] The point of view in “Holy Thursday” from Experience differs in that the speaker seems to be among the impoverished rather than above them. The speaker could have once been one of these children, explaining why they have a jaded, yet insightful, outlook on Holy Thursday. The speaker questions the true nature of the song the children sing: “Can it be a song of joy?” (Blake 6). The scene does not accurately reflect the conditions the children live in, and the speaker is able to see the underlying sorrow. The figurative setting of the children is not one of comfort or joy: “And their fields are bleak and bare” (Blake 10). The speaker displays a better grasp on reality than that of the former poem. The true nature of the children’s condition is revealed, and this point of view comes across as reliable and unwilling to see the procession for anything but what it is: a grandiose performance of Christian charity, one that is all pomp and splendor but has no actual value. 

Blake’s “Holy Thursday” from Experience presents a more grounded view on the children being paraded around town. The tone reflects a bleak reality as the speaker has no reason to sell a clean and acceptable product. “Holy Thursday” from Innocence is rooted in physical, surface-level observations. The tone is condescending, and the speaker is trying hard to show that the children are happy and well taken care of. Blake’s two contrasting poems illustrate the reality of the human condition; most forcefully, these poems indict an indifferent system that turns a blind eye to the suffering of children. Innocence is equated to naiveté and experience is equated to realism, and the “Holy Thursday” poems exemplify that innocence can be a choice in order to create a narrative that better suits the conscience of the speaker.  [MOU21] 

Works Cited

Blake, William, and Paul Peter Piech. “Holy Thursday”from Songs of Innocence; “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Experience. Taurus Press of Willow Dene, 1971.[MOU22] 

 [MOU1]Relevant course information goes here.

The entire paper is formatted in MLA style. Double-spaced, 11 or 12 point font, left justified, indent the start of new paragraphs, title is centered.

 [MOU2]Papers need an appropriate title that reflects the theme/argument of your essay. Do not underline the title. Make sure it is capitalized correctly.

 [MOU3]Italics for titles of long works like books or collections of poems.

 [MOU4]“double quotation” marks for titles of short works like individual short poems.

 [MOU5]A clear enunciation of the student’s thesis for the essay. This is what her paper will explore.

 [MOU6]The first sentence in this body paragraph is her sub-topic sentence. This sentence will set up what the student will explore in this paragraph and will dictate the kinds of evidence she will use to support her main thesis.

 [MOU7]Imagery is an example of one of the “plethora of devices.”

 [MOU8]Note the placement of the comma here; it goes inside the close quotes.

 [MOU9]How to cite a direct quote from a poem: author last name followed by line number, in ( ). If line numbers are not provided then give page numbers.

 [MOU10]Sub-topic sentence for this paragraph.

 [MOU11]The forward slash indicates a line break in the poem.

 [MOU12]This sentence nicely wraps up the argument made in this and the preceding paragraph.

 [MOU13]Sub-topic sentence.

 [MOU14]Notice how the quote is integrated into the sentence and becomes a syntactic part of it.

 [MOU15]This is a different way to introduce the quote: by using a colon.

 [MOU16]The quote is followed up with analysis. Quotes are not self-explanatory. You must introduce the quote and then follow up with analysis and show how the quote relates to the rest of your argument in that paragraph.

 [MOU17]Use of … to denote omitted words.

 [MOU18]Again, analysis of the quote follows the actual quote.

 [MOU19]Great transition sentence that ties in to the previous paragraphs (“Blake also …”) and signals how the argument will now move forward.

 [MOU20]Excellent example of 1. Introduce a quote 2. Provide the actual quote 3. Explain the quote.

 [MOU21]A wonderful summary of the student’s thesis without necessarily repeating the introduction.

 [MOU22]Correct formatting for the Works Cited entry.

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Reading AssignmentRead Chapter 29 (pages 280 – 286)What was the result of the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act in 1976 on world fisheries? Explain both positive and negative results.

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Unit 4 ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTION Deliverable Length: 1,000–1,250 words OBJECTIVES You are now ready to start representing your system integration project by utilizing a system integration framework, which you researched as part of your Discussion Board assASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONDeliverable Length:1,000–1,250 words

Modeling Exercise 3 Instructions

Overview

For this modeling exercise, you will revisit the scenario given in the Modeling Exercise 2 Instructions document and consider the following, additional information.

Materials Required

To complete this deliverable, you will need the following materials

This documentMicrosoft WordLucidChart.com, http://draw.io, StarUML (http://staruml.io), PlantUML (http://plantuml.com), or Microsoft Visio

Scenario

During your first visit to the restaurant, you conducted interviews with several people to better understand their responsibilities and job functions. The following descriptions are from the notes taken during that initial visit.

Owner: The owner created the Mom & Pop Pizza 8 years ago and is now looking at opening a second store by year 10. In the planning for this, his family has convinced him that franchising the operation could be very successful. One large barrier to franchising is that of a consistent repeatable process. Therefore, the owner has decided to contact you to design an enterprise IT system that would be scalable to support a multi-state franchise. That being said, the owner has no vision of what this system would look like. He is a pizza chef, not an IT consultant/designer.

Manager: The manager runs the day-to-day operations, as well as the hiring/firing/training; the manager is required to schedule all employees. Finally, the manager is responsible for inventorying and ordering the supplies needed. He orders supplies once a week.

Hostess: The hostess greets customers and takes reservations over the phone. The hostess also takes delivery/takeout orders and arranges for delivery drivers. The hostess also seats customers when tables become available.

Waiter: The waiter takes customer orders, delivers orders to one of the cooks, and takes drinks and food to the customers. The waiter also delivers the bill to the customer, takes money (or credit cards) to the hostess for processing, and returns change (or credit card receipt for signing).

Cook: The cook receives orders from the wait staff and prepares the customer’s selections.

Food Prep: The food prep prepares sauces and dough for cook’s use; he/she also prepares salad and all other side dishes.

Busboy: The busboy cleans tables after customers leave, preparing the tables for the next customers. The busboy also delivers dirty dishes to the dishwasher.

Accountant:The owner has traditionally filled the accountant role. He tallies receipts at the end of the day and makes bank deposits. He pays all the bills on a bi-weekly basis. He accounts for all employee hours, and every 2 weeks, he prepares payroll checks. He files all IRS and tax documentation and manages the health and benefits plans of the employees.

Instructions

With a revised business process in hand, it is time to begin identifying the key ways that you anticipate the users will interact with M&P PIES. To do that, you will create a use case diagram and 5 use case scenarios to model those interactions. It is important to note that a use case reflects the direct interaction that a user will have with the system, not an activity that takes place outside the system. For example, we would not want to create a use case for preparation of sauces, unless we were designing the system to have some role in that activity. For this third exercise, develop a use-case diagram showing all actors and use cases for the proposed, to-be system, and then choose 5 use cases from your use-case diagram and write a detailed use case scenario for each one. You will need to refer back to the to-be process description given in Modeling Exercise 2 instructions, as well as the notes provided above from the user interviews. As you complete this exercise, keep the following in mind:

Refer to the Modeling Exercise grading rubric before you begin this exercise.Even though we are now modeling the use cases for a technology system, the use cases should still avoid references to any specific technology.The purpose of this diagram is to visually communicate with the client the way we expect them to use the new system. As such, your diagram should be easy to read for a non-technical person, follow correct UML syntax for use case diagrams (see the UML textbook), and include a proper title and legend (you will need to draw the legend manually, using the unique shapes used in the diagram along with a short textual description of what each shape represents).Be sure to model your use cases such that they represent actual interactions with the system and not activities that would occur outside the context of the new system.Don’t forget to include a system boundary in your use-case diagram.There are no set-in-stone solutions for this exercise. Just as in the real world, there are no off-the-shelf solutions for every IT challenge. It is not our intention to limit your creative knowledge designs.The instructor may make suggestions or add additional requirements in the weekly announcements for each modeling exercise, so be sure to heed those suggestions as you prepare your models, or you may lose points.

Submit this assignment by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Sunday of Module/Week 6.

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Unit 5. Deliverable Length: 4–6 pages OBJECTIVES In this final week, you have one more major task. Develop a detailed project plan for all of the final implementation, acceptance confirmation, and closeout activities, and then transition it to the operatiDeliverable Length:4–6 pages

Final Project Assignment #5: Application DesignApplication Design Deliverables

Develop a complete set of Application Screen Designs using either the designed interfacescreens with Microsoft PowerPoint, MS Publisher, HTML Prototype, or developing aprototype using other software.A minimum of eight (8) interface screens is required (nine screens including login page).Capture screenshots of each interface from your design files (prototype or Visio mockup) and document in one MS Word document for clear and effective presentation of allthe screens and information.Be sure to include the complete presentation, including branding, for the interface andfollow best practices. Include all database elements, as the screens should account for all the information inthe system. Design the application interface and screens/forms to consider the usability chapter inthe book, specifically considering the interface text, menus, input boxes/methods, navigation, buttons, and overall screen functionality.Must include a detailed Interface Structure Diagram illustrating the relationshipsfrom screens and components throughout the prototype application design.In the MS Word document, be sure to include documentation of navigation flowbetween the screens, tool tips, input validations and pre-determined error messages (seeyour use cases for ideas). This can also be programmed into the prototype, if youchoose.Notes: Even if you did not have use cases for the functionality, the screen designs shouldbe present for the design of the deliverable to ensure a complete product. You cannot use a pre-canned website subscription. These templates will not be avalid submittal for this assignment.Deliverable: Include both the HTML or mock up files and the MS Word documentDevelop five (5) Reports (output) specifications for your system, including at least onemanagement report. Illustrate the report using sample data to present the users with theinformation. In MS Word, design a sample management report and for other report types specific tothe application. Prototype or Mock-up the sample output reports, so a user can reviewthe sample reports and provide input/feedback into the initial design. This shouldinclude fake data to illustrate the use of the report. It will be a prototyping tool used togather information from the users regarding their reporting needs. Be sure to include the presentation of the summary information, along with other keyelements of a report:TitleDateSourceParameters (data range, etc..)Page NumbersFoot NotesDevelop an Application Test Plan. Use the sample template to develop a comprehensive testplan for performing system testing. The application test plan must have at least 50 tests to beperformed, and should include the following for each test:Test #Description of TestExpected System ResultsPass/Fail IndicatorRemarks/CommentsDate TestedTester NameDevelop a Database Dictionary using the MS Word template provided for the assignment. AllEntities and Attributes should be defined completely in clear language.Due: November 23, 2020 at 4:30PM. Upload files to the File Exchange under Group Pages

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